Tales from the Remnant Bin – Sadie Slip, Olya Shirt and Rise Turtleneck

I had a week off work – and what can I say, I got productive!

This time I decided to challenge myself to sew from my seemingly endless stash (again) and also to sew an outfit using ‘remnant bin’ rescues.

For no particular reason… it just seemed like a good idea.

I was originally inspired by these two pieces I had found sitting alongside each other.

Rayon knit and khaki linen - looked so good together!

Rayon knit and khaki linen – looked so good together!

I had 1.6m of print rayon knit and 1.4m of khaki linen.

I played with several ideas for the top but eventually settled on the Rise Turtleneck by Papercut Patterns. I had this pattern in my stash, having made the Fall Turtleneck a couple of years ago.

There isn’t much to say about this! It’s an easy make, I cut and finished this in about 90 minutes – extra time spent on hems. I was between sizes and decided to make up the Small instead of the Extra Small. It’s a looser fit – but not baggy. I think I will add more of these basics to my wardrobe. Easy, comfortable and practical.

Rise Turtleneck by Papercut Patterns in a rayon knit

Rise Turtleneck by Papercut Patterns in a rayon knit

I was prevaricating between a loose pinafore style dress, trousers or a straighter pinafore style… and in the end I chose none of these options.

I almost made trousers… well I actually did make trousers – just not khaki ones! I whipped up a test pair in my last piece of cotton/linen (see my Pipit post) and decided while I didn’t hate the trousers, I would like them much less in a solid, prone-to-crinkle linen. And I didn’t think a fitted turtleneck would pair very well with front-pleat trousers and elastic in the back waist.

Testing trouser patterns

This was just a test with my leftover linen. Pull-on pants with front pleats and elastic back waist. Pattern from Kana’s Standard

I was SO tempted to put the fabric aside and move onto something else… however that’s not really the point of a challenge. The challenge is to finish.

I got up the next morning and pulled out my Tessuti Patterns, Sadie and Claudia. I umm-ed and ahh-ed and decided I would prefer the neckline of the Sadie with a turtleneck for autumn layering. This was a real squeeze on 1.4m of fabric – however as I am 5 foot 3-ish, I’ve shortened my Sadie pattern pieces considerably and it ‘just’ fit.

I’ve made this dress four times now! After my first version, I lengthened the facing pieces to be much longer – a similar length to the Ogden Cami by True Bias.

I discovered with my first version, that the neckline facing wanted to roll outwards a lot – despite understitching. I’ve also seem this on other Sadies and even saw someone at The Fabric Store wearing one with the facing stitched down from the outside – which probably helps but the visible stitching would annoy me. I’ve found by lengthening the facing, almost a half lining, the rolling is minimised. I still use the original facing pieces and just cut interfacing using these and apply the interfacing to the top of the facing pieces.

Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns. Inner lining/facing

Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns. Inner lining/facing

I added the optional back fisheye darts as the linen has much less drape than my versions in lightweight tencel denim and silk.

Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns.

Very windy afternoon – sorry! There are fisheye darts in my back!

I left the hem raw. I will run a line of stitching around the edge to keep fraying slightly under control – however I love a bias frayed hem and in linen it adds some rustic charm.

Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns.

A linen Sadie Slip Dress. Taken on a windy afternoon!

I’m surprised just how much I like this! An incredible simple, versatile sundress. Or slip under a shirt or jacket – or layered with a turtleneck. Will look great with a faded denim jacket and sneakers.

It’s been very warm for late autumn, today it as 28 degrees – so no photos with the turtleneck other than a garage selfie (currently dance studio and gym).

Sadie Slip Dress

garage selfie late in the evening

Sadie Slip Dress and a Rise Turtleneck

Sadie Slip Dress and a Rise Turtleneck – hoping this works for layering for autumn

And finally I pulled about ANOTHER piece of remnant bin yarn-dyed linen in mushroom pink and it also seemed to pair beautifully with the khaki linen (khaki is a fabulous neutral!) so decided to add it to the challenge…

I made myself a Paper Theory Olya Shirt. I needed determination to make this one happen!!

Firstly there was an epic pattern Tetris episode to fit it on the piece of linen I had chosen. I even photographed by leftover scraps because I was so proud of myself!

Fabric scraps after pattern tetris to make an Olya shirt

Fabric scraps after pattern tetris to make an Olya shirt

Then I realised when I went to attach the cuffs (late in construction)… I had only cut out one set. I felt like crying. I lay awake in bed, contemplating if having contrasting cuffs was cheating… and if I did that, should I add contrast collar band and button plackets… yes, I like to overthink things.

Whew - two pieces large enough for cuff pieces

Whew – two pieces large enough for cuff pieces

Fortunately I found two pieces and squeezed out two more cuffs pieces. Whew!

THEN I unpinned my collar bands to discover I was missing a chunk of fabric from one of the bands (the perils of block fusing and then cutting out on the fold!). There was definitely no.more.fabric to cut another band. Cue more overthinking…. and then I decided to just ‘patchwork’ a piece onto the collar band. Not ideal but it worked.

collar band - rescue patchwork

Agreed. The grainline of the piece is not ideal… however it was the only option.

This is a slightly more complex shirt in some ways – there are hidden pockets in the front seams and the front yoke extends into the sleeve. I highly recommend following along with the Paper Theory sewalong online for attaching the sleeve. There is a pivot point, which is a little tricky and then you need to figure out where to go next and where to stop. Hard to explain however the best advice I can offer you is to just slow down – or even walk away for a while if you are finding it perplexing. There is nothing to invites disaster more than exhaustion and frustration!

Olya Shirt, Paper Theory & Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns

Olya Shirt, Paper Theory & Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns

Olya Shirt, Paper Theory & Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns

Olya Shirt – it is a very roomy shirt, boxy and airy.

Olya Shirt, Paper Theory & Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns

Love these colours together!

I made this pattern up as a shirtdress last year. Sorry it hasn’t made it onto the blog… I left off the front pockets on this version. While I like the dress in itself, it feels like a massive pyjama shirt due to the colour/stripe and I’m not sure what to do with it. Maybe dye it… or wear it open as a duster coat. Or just put it aside for a while. I did that with my Flint Pants and now wear them regularly.

Olya Shirt dress

Olya Shirt dress

Anyway… I’m pretty pleased I hung in there and finished off these three remnant bins garments. Challenging myself to use a piece of fabric, find a suitable pattern from my stash and turn them into versatile wardrobe additions is a real win.

Fabric: 1.4m Rayon print knit, cost $3.80; 1.4m khaki premium linen suiting, cost $10.40, 1.5m dusky pink yarn dyed linen $10. Total cost $24.20

Patterns used: Rise turtleneck, Papercut Patterns; Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Patterns; and Olya Shirt, Paper Theory.

So there you have it. Three new wardrobe staples in 4 days. All unloved pieces from a remnant bin!

Banjo on the beach during COVID-19

I’ve had people asked me if I get embarrassed taking photos at the beach. Well this one is 9kms long, you are always excessively socially distanced on this one! Yes, that’s old Banjo who always made regular and popular appearances on this blog and Instagram. He will be 11 in August!

The Tale of Two Turtleneck – Monroe and Fall

Tessuti Patterns Monroe Turtleneck
vs
Fall Turtleneck Papercut Patterns

On a cold winter day, a snuggly turtleneck holds endless appeal. And this year it has been a cold winter, bitter mornings and colder winds than I’m used to. No bare feet at the beach this winter!

This Aussie winter, Tessuti Fabrics spoilt us with a free pattern – the Monroe turtleneck. It was an obvious choice to try.

Monroe - Tessuti Patterns

Monroe – Tessuti Patterns

The drafting & style of this one reminds me of the pared back & minimalistic Japanese sewing patterns. There is minimal shaping and plenty of ease. I find the neckline to be a little tight and requires a ‘tug’ to pull it over my head. I love the 3/4 sleeve length option.

Monroe - Tessuti Patterns

Monroe – Tessuti Patterns

The length of the body of the Monroe is slightly longer than the Papercut Patterns Fall.

Monroe - Tessuti Patterns

Monroe – Tessuti Patterns. This one has lots of ease – for me.

To contrast, as I already had it in my stash, I also made the Fall Turtleneck from Papercut Patterns. Still a turtleneck with drop shoulders, the Fall however quite a different fit and style to it.

Comparison of the Monroe (left) and Fall (right) armhole and shoulder pattern lines

Comparison of the Monroe (left) and Fall (right) armhole and shoulder pattern lines

The armholes and shoulder lines are much more shaped – and as a result, of course, the sleeves also have more shape to their cap and a noticeable ‘front’ and ‘back’ to the sleeve draft.

papercut_fall1

The neck is much higher and turns over into a delightfully snuggly but not-too-tight turtleneck to ward off those cold winter winds.

Fall Turtleneck - Papercut Patterns

Fall Turtleneck – Papercut Patterns

Thoughts

I found both patterns to be quite short in the body – but the Monroe less so. I would have added length to the Papercut Patterns Fall body however I only ‘just’ had enough to cut the Fall pattern. I originally purchased this piece of merino knit to make a Monroe (Monroe requires 120cm, the Fall 130cm).

I need some new jeans – perhaps some of the high waisted variety… will I succumb to the Persephone Pants fever gripping Instagram? I may one day ‘tuck in’ my tops… who knows!

I’ve worn both turtlenecks quite a lot, perhaps the Monroe more due to the longer body length which is better on the cold days. I think I prefer the Fall for it’s heavier neckline and fit. Then again… it is considerably more expensive than the free Monroe!

Merino leftovers – sew a buff!

I did have long thin off-cuts after cutting out both patterns I turned into a ‘winter buffs’. These have been great on cold mornings when I’m out running (running when frost settles is not fun – especially when frost isn’t something you see very often – if ever!). I’ve been surprised how much I’ve used them – who knew that a random tube of fabric was so useful! Check out the YouTube clips on the multiple ways you can wear them.

Patterns: Monroe Turtleneck, Tessuti Patterns (free) & Fall Turtleneck, Papercut Patterns
Fabric: Merino knit, The Fabric Store, Brisbane

Papercut Adrift Dress – a birthday dress

or When You Almost Exactly Copy The Pattern Envelope…

I had this lovely spotty rayon fabric in the stash and while I tried to resist more or less replicating the Papercut Patterns version, I couldn’t resist this pattern/fabric combination. My Grainline Alder Dress was made from the same fabric and has been a much-loved summer dress… so here we are with a new summer dress!

Hello Papercut Adrift Dress

Papercut Adrift Dress - front view

Papercut Adrift Dress – front view

This pattern comes with a skirt and dress variation. Obviously this is the dress. The skirt option has front and back waist darts and a waistband.

Described by Papercut as… A feminine dress for warm summer days. Features include gently ruffled sleeves and hemline, wrap skirt, bust darts and gathered waist with additional wrap skirt option. The wrap-around skirt option features a waistband with front and back darts.

CONSTRUCTION

Very simple. The pieces went together beautifully.

Skirt Construction

I did hit a snag as I traced the pattern pieces and constructed the garment without much (any) reference to the instructions – other than a cursory glance.

When I went to fit the bodice to the skirt, they did not match at all… after a ‘what is wrong with me’ message to ever-helpful Papercut team, it turns out the skirt pattern pieces have darts marked on them but do not indicate it is for the skirt option only.

So if you are a derp-head like me and don’t always reference instructions, then you will hit a snag. Darts are only for the skirt option – this is not indicated on the pattern sheet. Once I unpicked the skirt darts, it went together perfectly.

The instructions (when I did read them) have you attached the flounce/frill to the skirt pieces and then sew the front and back pieces together. I chose to sew the front/back skirt pieces together. Then the flounce pieces together. Then I attached the flounce as one piece to the skirt pieces. I’m sure that one continuous seam doesn’t make ‘that’ much difference to the overall flow of the flounce… but I would prefer to construct the skirt that way.

You do need to do the skirt hem before you attach it to the bodice as the front flounces are sewn into the waist seam. On the bright side, you won’t have a project hanging about that just requires a hem. This one forces you to hem mid project!

Papercut Adrift Dress - back view

Papercut Adrift Dress – back view

Seam Allowances

As the seam allowances are only 1/2 inch, I think it’s best to neaten all your edges before you sew the seams. In some cases the instructions do tell you to overlock before you sew the seam. In other cases not. Having sew a few Papercut Patterns I knew this was a issue and overlocked most things before I sewed the seams. I chose to overlock the skirt/flounce edges together after sewing the seam.

I find overlocking 1/2 inch seams a little more fiddly (after sewing a seam) and the results not as neat as those with a larger seam allowance. Some fabrics might distort while overlocking – so be mindful of that.

Neck facing

The instructions also have you top stitch the neck facing down. I’ve chosen to catch stitch it down at the shoulder seams and this has not been a problem.

Hems

The skirt and sleeve hems are finished with a narrow hem.

Papercut Adrift Dress - side view

Papercut Adrift Dress – side view (just befor birthday lunch at a local vineyard)

Waist tie

I did insert cord as instructed but didn’t like the look.  So I made a thin cord of self fabric instead. I think next time I will try inserting elastic as I prefer as elastic gathers in a skirt at the waist – much more tidy. This would also mean no buttonholes at the waist for the cord.

The cord and fabric cord doesn’t slide as easily and I tend to arrange the gathers to be more evenly spaced.

I also found having a white cord hanging at my waist amongst the flounce at my waist was a bit visually messy. Perhaps with a more patterned/floral fabric, the cord wouldn’t bother me – it all comes down to fabric choice and pattern.

THOUGHTS

I do rather love this.

A fairly simple sew – provided you have patience with attaching curved flounces and rather endless curved narrow hems.

Cute and fun. Feminine without being twee.

I love the sleeve/skirt flounces and the loose fit of the garment.

It’s best suited (in my opinion) for fabrics with some soft drape.

I thought I might add a little to the bodice length next time… I am 5 foot 4 but very long through the torso. Then again, the slightly raised waistline makes my legs look long when I wear heels… might not be such a bad thing? 🙂

Papercut Adrift Dress - sleeves

Papercut Adrift Dress – sleeves

I’m surprised we haven’t seen more of these on blogs and social media, it’s a nice little summer dress.

Oh and it’s the ‘birthday dress’… because I wore it today for the first time, took photos after lunch and it’s my birthday… counts as a birthday dress… yes?

Pattern: Papercut Adrift Dress, XXS
Fabric: Rayon (woven), Spotlight (Australia). Purchased during a clearance sale for $3!
Shoes: Jo Mercer
All purchased by me.

Also see: Carly in Stitches  |  tagged Instagram posts

 

This post first appeared on www.sewbusylizzy.com

Papercut Patterns, Guise Pants aka Does Lizzy Wear The Pants?

It’s been awhile.

I was in a sewing ‘funk’, didn’t know what to sew or where to start. So I asked Instagram how to drag myself out of it. Amid the many suggestions was a very funny comment from Jen of The Stitcher and Gatherer to make some pants. As she pointed out, I make a lot of skirts, dress, tops and jackets… and I needed to challenge myself.

So I did.

Hello Guise Pants from Papercut Patterns.

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants - front view

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants – front view

Now I will be 100% honest, I had plenty of reservations about this pattern – and I even told Katie of Papercut Patterns that 🙂

  1. I generally prefer skinny jeans or wide-legged flat-front trousers – it’s all or nothing with me; and
  2. elastic back waist. I live in a holiday/retirement destination and elastic waists of any description remind me of sensible shoes and comfortable pants worn by a significant proportion of my community…l’m not ready to go there yet!; and
  3. I wasn’t sold on the pattern photography – not my colours and styling. That said, I like to look beyond that and see if I can ‘make it my own’ – that’s part of what inspires me to sew.

However I love a challenge.
Katie had sent me the pattern (along with the Flutter and Sway) when I had enquired about the Papercut Pleated Pants – that’s another blog post in the not too-distant future.
Plus I had traced the Guise out weeks ago, I fell in love with the new tencel denim at Spotlight and the rest is history!

SEWING THE GUISE PANTS

Size: There are a few versions of these pants floating about the internet (see end of post for links) and a couple mentioned that they had sized down or would next time around. My hip measurement fell just below the XS size so I decided to make the XXS. I admit, making pants that are too small terrifies me as there is nothing more ego deflating than too-tight pants. I could have made a toile/muslin… however having made a few Papercut Patterns I decided to trust my instincts and just leapt in.

Fit: I don’t know!
I don’t often wear pants of this loose-fitting, pleated and casual style. In fact, one of the reasons I made the belt as I really don’t own belts for trousers.
They feel OK and are certainly very comfortable.
They do seem very generously sized. Even sizing down, they are a little droopy about my waist and hips. However I think the soft drape suits them with this fabric choice.
I love how the legs are taper around my calves and ankles. I cut about 1 inch off the length (I’m 5 foot 4). I’m going to try these with the hems rolled up a little. I like how Jolies Bobines styled hers.
There is quite a lot of ‘room’ in the crotch however they seem to sit nicely over the junk trunk and hang well at the front.
If you are a pleated pant fit guru – please share your thoughts!

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants without a belt

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants without a belt

Construction: The pattern went together without a hitch. One of the easiest makes yet. You can read quite a detailed post about it at Gingermakes – and she notes an error in the instructions and some other quirks with Papercut Patterns – it’s well worth a read if you are making these.
I found the instructions really straight-forward and comprehensive. I have sewn welt pockets and fly fronts before – however I found these instructions really helpful and clear. There wasn’t any ‘support’ from Google search.
I did overlock all the edges of each piece before I sewed. I don’t always do this as I think overlocking can distort the fabric edges. However as this fabric was stable, I overlocked the edges – as I find Papercut Patterns 1cm seam allowances rather small when feeding them through the overlocker (not overlocking both together). They just never turn out as neat as I would like.

Pockets: Four pockets! Two front and two back welt pockets. I had some floral silk fabric that I decided to use for pocketing. I found this on a remanent table at my local independent fabric shop in Port Macquarie. All five metres of it for $5. I’ve been hoarding it for lining purposes.

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants, sewn by Sew Busy Lizzy

Back pocket detail

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants side pockets, front pleats and self-fabric belt

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants side pockets, front pleats and self-fabric belt. Sorry my belt is twisted – no mirrors at the beach. I pulled these on in the car!

Welts: My back welts are not quite perfect – but they are OK. I love these little details. I thought the welt fusing piece (inside the trousers) could be just a little bit narrower so it isn’t visible above the pocket on the inside. That’s just a visual detail if you like picture perfect garment guts.

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants - welt pockets

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants – welt pockets. I’m mid stride here.

Fly front: I found the pieces and instructions fabulous, this is one of my best fly fronts yet.

Waist: The pattern has you neaten the inner waist band edge and stitch it down. I decided to finish my edge with bias binding for ‘neatness sake’. Gingermakes widened her pattern piece and folded the raw edge under – do whatever rocks your world I say.
I machined the bias on the right side and then took the pants to work and handstitched the bias edge under to the wrong side. Why so pedantic? Mainly because I do like neat finishes… and then I could get sewing on the rest of the pants as soon as I got home! I love to maximise every minute of my day.
The elastic back waist may be a deterrent for some. It was for me at first. However the back doesn’t make the fabric fall in an unflattering way over the ‘junk trunk’ – or mine at least.

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants - I've included this so you can see how the elastic back looks. It is not 'that' gathered

Papercut Patterns Guise Pants – I’ve included this so you can see how the elastic back looks. It is not ‘that’ gathered

Belt and belt loops: I laid out my pieces with the intention of having a skerrick of fabric left running down the selvedge to make a self-fabric tie belt. It’s a little wider than the belt loops but I wanted the belt to look like that – I know, not everyone’s style but it was the look that was in my head. I would have loved it slightly longer and flared at the ends… but no fabric left!
I opted for the fabric belt as well as sometimes a different coloured belt seems to chop me in half and visually shorten me.
If I make these again, I would make the belt loops slightly longer, they seemed ‘just the right’ size. I would rather cut them slightly longer and them trim them back. That’s just how I construct things. I like a bit more room for fiddling.

Fabric: Tencel denim from Spotlight, Australia. This is LOVELY stuff. Beautiful to work with and I will be curious to see how it wears. (Note: after 6 hours of wear I was pleasantly surprised at how this fabric didn’t crease excessively).
I opted for tencel denim as I decided that anything with too much body would potentially make the pleats a little too ‘sticky-outie’ and result in unwanted lower tummy/crotch ‘poofiness’. I’m really happy with this fabric and pattern match.
I think these would be great in a light wool crepe for casual office pants aka secret pyjamas.

…and how I’m most likely to wear my pants… beltless & casual… that’s how I roll (or prefer to).

guise pants_me1

Beltless – they really need a belt to hold them up… but the seagulls don’t seem to mind so much.

Also See: Gingermakes | Jolies Bobines | Craft Sanctuary | The Monthly Stitch

Thanks Jen for the suggestion – I’m back to ‘normal’.

sewing again and back at the beach

sewing again and back at the beach

Pattern: Papercut Patterns Guise Pants
Note: Papercut Patterns provided this pattern for preview purposes. All opinions my own. No affiliate links in this post.
Shirts: RTW – Just Jeans, Australia
Shoes: Zensu (lovely red patent leather… never-been-worn from the op shop for the princely sum of $5)
Earrings: Pandora
Location: Oxley Beach, Port Macquarie

This post first appeared on http://www.sewbusylizzy.com

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A Casual Flutter (Tunic) & Papercut Pattern Giveaway Winner

or One Good Flutter Deserves Another…

I’ve worn my rayon Flutter Tunic several times and was even stopped this week by a lady who asked “where did you get that amazing dress?” I was wearing it with my beloved black Avani boots as blogged – plus opaque black tights, a white scarf and long red wool coat.

And one good Flutter deserves another… yes? So I decided to try a more casual look…

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Front view.

Yes those are crazy OTT vintage cowboy boots… they inspire deep hatred or love. I don’t mind either way – they are fun to wear and make me smile. Although the lower front boot cut makes my legs look longer (or tunic shorter!) than my styling of the first Flutter dress!

Yes, it’s short but you only live once, my new boots (in transit) which I planned to wear with this, finish closer to my knee – which means less legs and the tunic doesn’t look quite as… frisky… I’ll wear this with tights in winter – it was such a beautiful winter afternoon I couldn’t be bothered. All the headlands and beaches were packed with people, walking and watching for the migrating whales. We saw a whale breach near the lighthouse – I still get excited by that stuff!

This Casual Flutter was inspired by Kirsty of Top Notch – she blogged her gorgeous frocktails Silk Flutter last week and mentioned she’d like a denim one. So when this paisley denim fabric threw itself out of the stash on Saturday afternoon shrieking it needed to be a Flutter, I made it – in less than three hours. I’m not the only one who has a chatterbox fabric stash am I?

I’d like to make another in plain denim with feature stitching and pockets. Pretty sure that might happen soon.

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Side view.

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Side view. My more sensible (flat!) Flore Duo Boots.

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Back view.

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Back view. While the tunic is loose, I don’t think it’s shapeless.

I used readymade bias binding for the neckline as I felt the denim would have been bulky. It worked beautifully.

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Neckline binding

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Neckline binding

I overlocked/serged all the pieces before I sewed the seams. I don’t usually do this for fear of warping or stretching the edges – however denim is quite stable to work with. I find the 1cm seam allowance is a bit fiddly to feed through my overlocker after sewing the seams so I decided the neaten the edges before I began.

PAPERCUT PATTERNS GIVEAWAY WINNER
Wow, there were a lot of entrants – over 120! Thank you so much for your interest and comments. I put everyone’s name in a spreadsheet to provide each name with a number. Then I used random.org to generate a number… and the winner is…

PIPS! of The Girl in a Teacup!

Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns. Front view.

Ahhhhh, those flutter sleeves… I love them! Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns.

Pattern: Flutter Tunic, Papercut Patterns
Fabric: Paisley printed denim, Spotlight
Boots: Flore Duo Boots & vintage American boots (obviously I suffered a severe bout of boot indecisiveness today)
Scarf: Cotton lace of forgotten origin. It is a paisley pattern though. Pure coincidence!

Note: Papercut Patterns provided this pattern for preview purposes. All opinions my own – I’ve made it twice just because I enjoy making and wearing it so much. No affiliate links in this post.

Oxley Beach, Port Macquarie.

Oxley Beach, Port Macquarie.

This post first appeared on http://www.sewbusylizzy.com