Sadie Slip Dress in tencel ‘denim’

I’ve been daydreaming about a bias slip summer slip dress in denim, maybe I’m stuck in the 90s. I’m ok with that, the music was great!

I guess it seems counterintuitive to sew a bias-cut dress in one of the heavier fabrics in the sewing galaxy. However I simply couldn’t shake this idea and here we are…

Sadie Slip Dress

Sadie Slip Dress, pattern by Tessuti Fabrics

This is the Sadie Slip Dress from Tessuti Fabrics.

I have loved this pattern since its release. If they agree with you, there is nothing more lovely to wear than a bias-cut dress. The way bias fabrics can slide and glide around your body as you move is simply sexy sinuous heaven to wear compared to a dress cut on the straight of grain that ‘hangs’.

Yes you can see my bra straps. No apologies. I intended to wear this over a tshirt but haven’t got around to making it yet. It was such a beautiful winter afternoon I decided ‘what the hell! Let’s blog this dress today!”. How gorgeous is this weather – 20 degrees at 4.30pm in the afternoon. The tshirt can wait (and to be honest… I’ll wear it with my bra straps showing… tsk tsk… #wildchild).

This is a ‘tencel denim’ rather than a traditional denim you use for jeans. Cut on the bias, it has a lovely satisfying weight about it to wear.

A simple summery slip dress. Sadie Slip Dress by Tessuti Fabrics

A simple summery slip dress. Sadie Slip Dress by Tessuti Fabrics. I STILL have my summer tanlines halfway through winter!

Shoestring straps

Turning narrow straps can be frustrating. However if you get your hands on something like the Dritz Tube Turners, life gets much easier. If you are a DIY sort I’m sure you can rustle up a similar set using piping/straws/skewers. I purchased my set after seeing a little twitter clip by Claire-Louise of the Thrifty Stitcher. She shares lots of useful tips and tricks – well worth the ‘follow‘!
I found my set on eBay. This youtube video is gives you a clear idea of the way they work.

Length

I haven’t hemmed this – yet.

Yes I’ve photographed and blogged it anyway as I am a little undecided whether to leave it this length or cut some more off. I find taking photos really helpful to make these decisions. So let’s consider this Sadie ‘a work in progress’.

I cut 4 inches off the length of this pattern before I even cut into my fabric. Rachel of Boo Dogg provided some sage advice about the length of the drafted pattern as she has made this a couple of times (you will find them on instagram, she’s not blogged them).

I’m 5 foot 4 for the record. So if you are about my height you might like to consider adjusting the pattern before you start.

Sadie Slip Dress, back view

Sadie Slip Dress, back view. I’ve use the back darts for additional shaping.

Facing

The instructions have you turn a narrow hem on the edge of the facing. If I was using silk, I probably would do this. As I was sewing in a heavier fabric, I opted to just overlock the edges of my facing to minimise any potential bulk in this area.

I used a suitable interfacing for this fabric, nothing too heavy. I also very carefully understitched the facing… yet the front edges still want to roll out along my bustline (which results in lots of awkward fiddling!). I really wish I had increased to depth of the facing pieces (more like the Odgen cami facings – you can see them in this sewalong post on True Bias. Compared to the Sadie facing pieces seen on this Tessuti blog post) as I think this may go some way to alleviating the tendency of the facings to roll out.

I’m going to stitch the facing sides down as per the Odgen cami construction and maybe try a tiny weight in the centre front of the facing. Fingers crossed.

Sewing with the Bias

Bias is notorious however I’ve never had too much drama sewing garments cut on the bias. I minimise all handling. I gently roll or fold my fabrics up, I never pick them up and hold them up. When I sew, I try to make sure the fabric is not sliding or hanging off the edges of my table. I try to minimise anything that might encourage ‘stretching’.
The Tessuti instructions are excellent and has you use tearaway Vilene to stabilise the neckline. I skipped this, thinking the fabric was reasonably stable and if I was gentle, the neckline should not distort during construction. I was lucky – it didn’t. Perhaps with silk or a similar fabric you might like to consider using Vilene to stabilise the neckline.

This pattern has optional back darts for shaping if you use fabric with less drape than a silk. I have used these darts on this dress.

Thoughts?

I do love this pattern. Great pattern, would make a simple summer dress, a sexy cocktail dress, a slip to wear under sheer dresses, a lovely nightie. Endless possibilities. A good pattern for $10.

The instructions do have you create full flat pattern pieces as you are cutting on the bias. So you may need to consider your paper supplies or pattern paper supplies when getting ready to make this.

Now to cut this off more or leave it be… I think I rather like this between-midi-and-maxi length… but perhaps tomorrow I will think different.

Pattern: Sadie Slip Dress, Tessuti Fabrics.
Size: XXS
Fabric: Floral Tencel Mid Wash, Spotlight Australia

Sadie Slip Dress, back view. Sewn in lightweight tencel denim. Pattern by Tessuti Fabrics

Sadie Slip Dress, back view. Sewn in lightweight tencel denim

Running
Last Monday I ran 18kms in 1 hour 43 minutes after work – just to see if I could. I have increased my distance considerably in the last few weeks – against all sound advice – and fortunately have not injured myself  in the process (yet!).
Then I came down with ‘the flu’ on Tuesday. Less than 2 weeks out from my first half marathon – I was gutted! I’ve recovered reasonably well but think my time might be a bit slower as a result. When it’s your first half marathon, anything is a ‘personal best’ – bonus.
Next weekend I shall be busy:- running and running and running!

Sadie on the way to the beach

Sadie on the way to the beach. Yes it’s winter here. I know. Poor me.

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Grainline Driftless and Tessuti Megan Cardigans

or the Tale of Two Cardigans…

Driftless and Megan Cardigan

Driftless and Megan cardigans

I confess I’m one of those people that decide they want a cardigan and then endlessly obsess over ALL the cardigan patterns. I do this for most garments. I comb through all the independent and Big 4 options. I’ll pour over blog posts, Google images, websites and in-store catalogues. I’ll decide what I want to make and then when I go to pick up the scissors… I’ll change my mind.

While Vogue 8780 continues to be one of my most worn and loved cardigans/jackets, I did want to find another cardigan pattern for a little variety.

I confess that I was luke warm when both the Grainline Driftless Cardigan and the Tessuti  Megan Cardigan were released. Nothing wrong with either, perhaps it’s the simple fact that cardigans are practical garments and it’s hard to get a blood rush about them?

To solve my usual inability to lock myself down to one pattern, I decided to make two different cardigans. I find sewing multiple versions of one pattern or different patterns of a similar garment interesting. Seeing how different fabrics change the same garment or comparing different features and construction of two garments is always interesting to me.

DRIFTLESS CARDIGAN

I’ve always found Grainline patterns to be endlessly wearable. I think Jen designs the perfectly practical, highly wearable designs that always seem to go together without a fuss. I also find her designs fit me well and so I keep returning to her patterns. My three Alder dresses and little linen Morris are some of my favourite things to wear.

Features

The Driftless body is very wide and boxy with dropped shoulders and very fitted sleeves.

The pockets remind me of the Vogue 1247 skirt and are constructed in a similar way – minus all the Hong Kong binding of course! I’ve noticed that these sorts of pockets are popping up in a lot of RTW cardigans this winter in Australia.

Driftless Cardigan - Grainline Studios. Front view.

Driftless Cardigan – Grainline Studios. Front view.

Construction

This is a very easy cardigan to construct – don’t let those pockets fool you. I managed to cut this out and nearly complete it in an evening. It’s largely constructed on the overlocker (serger) with the exception of the pockets, thread chains and hand sewing down the neckband.

Driftless Cardigan - Grainline Studios. Back view.

Driftless Cardigan – Grainline Studios. Back view. I do like how it hangs across my back. I am a definite ‘slouch’ girl.

Thoughts

It’s a bit ‘Sunday afternoon’. Very casual, slouchy and not very dressy. I guess that sounds negative but it’s not at all. Those types of garments have a place in many wadrobes. Can’t be ‘fancy pants’ all the time! While it isn’t my favourite cardigan, it’s been worn a lot anyway as it’s ‘easy’ to wear, the type of garment you grab as you head out the door in case the breeze turns chilly. I don’t think my fabric choice helped. It’s some sort of cotton knit terry fabric… from the bargain table at Spotlight. I think it would be might nicer in a marle, slightly textured, merino knit. It may also be interesting with thoughtful colour choice as a colour-blocked cardigan.

I made view B with the split hem that is slightly lower at the back.

Driftless Cardigan - Grainline Studios. Back view.

Driftless Cardigan – Grainline Studios. Back view.

 

MEGAN CARDIGAN – Tessuti Fabrics

Now this lass and I became instant best friends. I’ve worn Megan a lot. She’s popped up on my Instagram feed quite a few times already. She was impatient and didn’t want to wait to be blogged. She simply screamed ‘WEAR ME – you know you want to’ and so I did.

I honestly had dismissed it as being ‘not for me’ as I had concerns about the fit on me, I thought the shoulders would be too wide and it would swamp me… thanks to the encouragement of Melanie, I decided to give her a try.

I do own several beloved longline RTW merino cardigans. They seem to go with everything from dresses to jeans, casual wear and a stylish office warmer on those chilly air conditioning days. Logically I should have made this cardigan a long time ago, alas I’m not always logical when it comes to my creative pursuits.

Megan Cardigan - Tessuti. Side View

Megan Cardigan – Tessuti. Side View

Features

Megan is a very simple cardigan, full length sleeves, flared side seams and a quirky side hem detail.

Megan Cardigan - Tessuti. Back View

Megan Cardigan – Tessuti. Back View

Construction

Again a very simple sewing project. Sewn up in no time at all on the overlocker with the shoulder seams having added seam tape to keep them in shape (I also did this with Driftless).

Megan Cardigan - Tessuti. Side View

Megan Cardigan – Tessuti. Oh that lovely little side hem detail 🙂 It makes my heart sing.

Thoughts

I adore this cardigan. I’ve received an amazing amount of compliments on it when it’s worn – which I think is the combination of the lovely flare of the hemline and the rather funky fabric that I paired with this pattern. It’s been worn a lot in its short life so far. I guess it also slots perfectly into that grungey casual vibe that I love to wear.

Megan Cardigan - Tessuti. Back View

Megan Cardigan – Tessuti. Back View – a nice flare without being overly cumbersome in ‘swooshiness’

The fabric I have had stashed for about three years, waiting for the right pattern as I feared the wrong choice would drop me into tragic acid wash territory. I picked this up at Clear It in Melbourne for the less than princely sum of $4 a metre. It’s certainly not high quality, a simple cotton interlock but it just seems to work with this pattern design.

Megan Cardigan - Tessuti. Side View

Megan Cardigan – Tessuti. front view

There will be many more Megans in my wadrobe in the future. The perfect layering cardigan.

ALSO SEE

Driftless: I simply visited Instagram and searched for the hashtag #driftlesscardigan

MeganMade by Melanie  | Clever Tinker  |  Boo Dogg  |  Rennous oh Glennuss

Not a city girl anymore… Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics

I expected to love this more… maybe it will grow on me – never say never. I can take a little longer to fall in love or warm to things… so I’m trying to be patient (not one of my finer qualities).

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics, Australia.

Styled to death 🙂 because that’s how I roll.

This is the Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics. Every other blogger in the southern hemisphere seems to have made this (some multiple times), talked about it, considered making it or read about it – OK I’m exaggerating but that’s how it feels! It will be interesting to see if Sydney fever hits our northern hemisphere friends as their winter approaches.

It’s certainly a different jacket pattern with a fresh take on construction techniques. We all love a challenge, so curiosity might get the better of some bloggers – certainly did me!

I loved it as soon as it was released. It’s got all of the perfect ingredients – a slightly deconstructed feel, modern, perfect for layering, exposed seams and of course… draped. It should be my perfect jacket. I’m Sydney born and bred so this was a sentimental make, I adore Sydney but I have lived on my beautiful coastal patch for nearly 15 years now. Maybe the salt and sand has seduced me after all.

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics, Australia.

I love the shorter sleeves, it’s very cool layering piece

There are lots of things that I like about this particular style, I love…

  • the short sleeves – it’s ideal for those not so cold days, perfect for layering and accessorising
  • the seam details
  • the pockets
  • the length – I love a longer line jacket for when I’m cruising about, they have a bit of flair and drama about them

I think a slightly heavier or more textured fabric might have worked better. I’m not a massive fan of the curved back yoke on me, I feel a little slumped. The lapels feel massive. Yes, I guess I could have fiddled with them for the photos… but this is how they fall on me so that’s how I left them.

This pattern is available as PDF (and printed) and at $10 for a PDF it’s a competitive price. It also comes with an A0 print shop version… which is often a deal clincher for me. My local Xerox shop prints A0 sheets for about $2.50 each. I really can’t stand sticking together A4 sheets and will avoid it whenever possible. It also comes as a ‘print at home’ file option.

The fabric is Italian cashmere coating from The Fabric Store, Brisbane – I can’t go to Brisbane and not go there, lovely store and lovely staff. This is gorgeous fabric that has a beautiful sheen and feels like liquid. If I don’t even up wearing this, I’m hoping to salvage enough fabric from my leftovers and the jacket itself to make a smaller jacket… I’m going to wait.

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics

No scarf… BTW I made up the ‘petite’ version of the Sydney.

Despite my bellyaching, I really like this pattern and recommend it if you are a little jaded of traditional jacket patterns – or lining, collars and buttons/zippers scare you. It’s fun and interesting to make. Most of the seams are overlapped by 3/8 inch and you sew down the centre of the overlap. The side seams are sewn in a traditional manner.

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics, Australia. Construction, the seams

I marked 3/8 inch in from the edge with pins, overlapped the edges and then sewed down the middle. You could choose to mark this with chalk or with thread – or by eye!

The instructions provide lots of photographs which is helpful. However sometimes the text is on one page & the photo is on the next. It’s not a drama it’s just a couple of times I’d find myself looking at a photograph at the top of the page & reading the text underneath… then realising the associated text was on a previous page. It’s just how I read, nothing wrong with the pattern instructions. I just found flicking between pages for one step threw out my rhythm a little.

There are pockets… not in the side seams… and no welts… oh no, you cut through the front of the jacket piece to gain access… yes, that requires a little bit of faith! And yes, more raw edges. The pockets certainly made for an interesting construction step – I love trying and learning new things.

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics, Australia.

Those lapels swamp me. I didn’t fiddle with them for photos and that is how they fell which I think has to do with the weight of the fabric.

All the edges are raw. So if you hate hems – this is the pattern for you! You do need to keep that in mind when selecting fabric as something that frays will not be suitable. Think boiled/felted wools, neoprene and ponte.

I really enjoyed making this – fun pattern, interesting jacket… Love at first sight doesn’t always happen – how many times have you dreamed of a garment, tried it on RTW and felt slightly deflated? Or felt lukewarm about something and then worn it forever? Well, that happens with sewing as well. This is definitely a case of ‘it’s not you, it’s me’. Great pattern.. perhaps not on me (I feel like the lone blogger *sobs*).

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics, Australia.

Taking a moment to soak up some warm winter sun.

Sorry can’t type much more – I’m typing like demented drunk monkey as I managed to sew straight through the pad of my left index finger on Friday morning… twice… yes, it hurt and still hurts – a lot. Funnily enough, I was madly stitching down fused (but not cooperative) stars onto my daughter’s ‘superhero’ tshirt (complete with gold net cape – her special power was ‘kindness and generosity’) so she could read her story to the kindergarten class in character that day.Giselle was thrilled (apart from the bleeding and swearing mother element) as the teacher said that if there was a ‘best dressed award’ it would have been her – more exciting because it was all thought out and designed by her. Superhero daughter status… but right now I’m sewing and typing a lot slower for a while!

There are lots of gorgeous version out there to inspire you…

Pattern: Sydney Jacket by Tessuti
Fabric: Cashmere coating, The Fabric Store (Brisbane)
Boots: Flore from Duo, scarf from Metalicus (old fave), beads from Portmans (years ago)

There’s potential for scoring a part-time job as a windsock at least…

Sydney Jacket by Tessuti Fabrics,

A little bit of swooping action… who doesn’t love a dramatic coat?

MOMENTARY LOSS OF MOJO

Thank goodness I am on holidays for a month at the end of this week, I am dead on my feet from exhaustion!

I have been super busy making/knitting things but need to take some pictures and finish some projects off in the next couple of days. I’m working on two skirts – one of which is my next Abakahan Fabrics 15 Pound Aussie project. The other I’m hoping to wear to the meet-up. How fabulous does this day out in London sound?? Thank you Rachel of House of Pinheiro who has done all the organising – can’t wait to meet you!

The gorgeous Rachel of House of Pinheiro

The gorgeous Rachel of House of Pinheiro (IRL I probably only come up to her kneecap)

CONFESSIONS OF SEWBUSYLIZZY

Like all truly hopeless marathon runners, I hit the wall of exhaustion hard after the Tessuti competition.

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK - final

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK – sleeves rolled back.

I thought it was a pretty neat entry. Thought out, well executed, highly wearable and stood out from the crowd, an imaginative use of the fabric. The photos were well styled and the backdrop was awesome! Unfortunately Tessuti did not agree – or at least not in a winning or honorable mention kinda way. The winner was an outstanding creation and they also decided to award five runners-ups with $100 Tessuti vouchers. And no, I didn’t make that short list either. They are all great projects, there were some in particular I really liked right from when they were posted.

I never ‘expect’ to win these comps. I’m fairly uncompromising person at times, I make something I will wear and suits the fabric – that’s not going to win me accolades – but I’d rather be ‘me’ and someone else’s version of ‘me’. At some point in our lives we all get caught up in being the someone other people want us to be or think that we are, I’m past being that person. I simply am who I am. Take me or leave me. I’ve never been a fan of reptiles of any shape or size – so my chameleon qualities are non-existent. My conclusion was that either:-

  1. my stitching is not up to scratch; or/and
  2. my fitting is not top-notch; or/and
  3. my style is not ‘Tessuti Style’; or…
  4. it actually doesnt mean much at all…

I admit, I felt quite despondent about entire process. It was one of those ‘it’s not you, it’s me’ moments. The feeling you get when you know it doesn’t matter what the dumper says to the dumpee, it’s simply a sugar-coated version of the truth.

Then I came back and read all the comments on this post, read the comments on the Tessuti post, the Twitter feedback and realised that to humble old me it’s your opinion that counts more. I might not be a stitcher to attract Tessuti applause but you gave me a standing ovation.

Thank you.

I’m annoyed with myself for being distracted by the Tessuti project and thinking about the outcomes and what that meant about me, my style, my ability. It took me a few days to realise it meant precisely nothing. I’m just me and I’m happy with that. $1K would have been nice or just a pat on the back – but you gave me truckloads of encouragement and admiration. That’s more than enough for me. I sew & blog because it makes me happy. That’s all.

My disappointment is no criticism of the Tessuti winners, the judges or anything else. It’s simply an interesting reflection about me & the process. And I’m tired, very very tired and that never helps.

It even manged to stop me stitching (it can and does happen LOL) while I gazed at my bellybutton in long sorrowful moments of self reflection & doubt. So much so that I lost faith that I could make my pink jacket. Stupid I know.

Burda 03/2013 jacket

Burda 03/2013 jacket. A pretty wool blend.

I have these wonderfully perfect buttons from Buttonmania in Melbourne – thanks to the ever-wonderful Rachel of My Messings. I could finish the jacket before I leave but I would botch the finish. And that’s not worth it. So it shall now wait for my return. I feel really bad about as Rachel made a huge effort to get them to me on time. Thank you Rachel you are fabulous.

I had a go at making my own buttons, they were horrendous. The fabric was thick and frayed awfully. I wish I’d taken a picture of my efforts but I tossed them aside in disgust and outrage! This buttons are perfection. You need buttons? Check out Buttonmania in Melbourne, Australia. Go on spoil yourself. I know you want to.

Perfection: Buttons from Buttonmania

Perfection: Buttons from Buttonmania

Me? I’ve gotta go. Sew & pack for London, Paris & Madrid. Yes, sucks to be me.

Thanks for hanging around with me and putting up with my random rumblings and sewing creations.

Love Lizzy. 🙂

 

Footnote: You know this post always bothered me a bit and I’ve frequently thought about taking it down. I think people misread it. I genuinely like Tessuti, I’m a customer and I actually didn’t mind not winning. At all. I know the winning entry would have been impeccable. I know people who know and highly respect the sewist (sorry just can’t type sewer when I talk about someone) and her & her skills are held in very high regard.
I guess the point I was making was simply I didn’t understand the criteria and I had no idea how to improve if I was to sew in a competitive sense. The more I sew and blog the more I’m not bothered by these things. I think Tessuti have more than a right to run their competitions however they like. I work in a highly regulated environment and initially struggled with anything that wasn’t strictly governed, had guidelines and so on. These days I kinda like that. I don’t mind how designers or fabric shops run their business – it’s none of my business. I’m happy to support them. In fact I love Tessuti and frequently buy fabric there.

Tessuti Gridlock Pop – mission complete

This project has been an endurance sport. I feel like that little athlete from an unknown country who staggers into the Olympic stadium about 3 hours after the winner of the marathon has crossed the line. A little nobody with no energy but simply determined to finish.

GRIDLOCK POP

The original post from Tessuti was to “design an outfit incorporating this fabric. Make it up however you like but make it just for you! Our brief is simply to create something stylish and appropriate as day wear.” That later seemed to morph into ‘garment’ but I had this ‘outfit’ concept stuck in my head.

I spent ages looking at this fabric. It sat next to me on the lounge some nights and I draped it over myself quite a bit. I learnt about the fabric, how it draped and felt against my skin. This fabric is hot to wear – it’s 21% cotton, 77% poly and 2% polyurethane – there is no way I would make this to wear as a ‘daywear’ dress in my climate. I would ‘glisten’ terribly at any time of the year (that’s sweat in ladylike terms). It’s ‘breathing’ properties are limited. It’s a great jacket fabric though.

I chose my trusty Fashion Star jacket in the end. Like everyone I loved the Burda Crossover Blazer and Burda 7491 came in a close second (I even traced Burda 7491 and purchased the Crossover Blazer pattern). Those jackets are lovely but I don’t think Gridlock would have done them justice. Thank you Trish & Felicity for their advice.

The fabric had arrived wrapped in an old McCalls pattern – it seemed like fate.

The colour, while being a very beautiful blue, looked dead against the cream background. It needed a ‘pick-me-up’ so I decided a burst of colour was required.

My first choice was dusty pink but when I visited the fabric store this cerise cotton linen leapt from the pile of bolts, saying ‘Whattaboutme?’. It made the Gridlock POP so I found some matching lining and away I went.

Tessuti Gridlock - POP

Tessuti Gridlock – POP

I think the temptation with this competition is to clad yourself from head to toe in Gridlock. I decided to create a statement piece (the jacket) and a dress is to complement the statement piece. They complement each other without being ‘matchy-matchy’. The items can be worn by themselves or together as an ‘outfit’. I wore the jacket today with my jeans for a TV interview!

That was the EASY PART.

THE JACKET – MCCALLS 6611

The optional extras that I inflicted on myself:-

  • Continuous bias binding
  • Made-by-me piping
  • Topstitching. Not just the jacket shell but also the lining – in contrasting thread (pink on blue and blue on pink)
  • Covered buttons

THE DRESS – MCCALLS 6699

As I prefer to make my life as difficult as possible, I made up Fashion Star pattern (6699) to pair with the jacket. It’s got cute contrast pockets, skirt vent and waistband. The Gridlock fabric is quite bulky so I chose to add strips of it to the pocket lining.

To the dress I added:-

  • Topstitching to the neckline and armhole.
  • Piping to the waistband (self made as for the jacket). I’ve really proud of the zipper as the piping is pretty close to perfect.
  • Underlined the skirt, I was concerned the pockets would show through the skirt.

I will write up a post later in the week about how I did a few things with this project – right now I’m too tired and over it to say much more (except I want to make a t-shirt for therapy).

There are some seriously awesome entrants now for this competition – which you would expect with $1000 on the line.

SHUT UP LIZZY & SHOW US THE PICTURES.

OK. Let the pictures speak for themselves. A little creased due to car travel – no ironing facilities at the lighthouse!

I can’t help but point out – how perfect are these shoes for this outfit!!?? The right colour and even a bit ‘Gridlocky’, it was pure luck, I’ve had these for years!

Even the ominous clouds seem to be the right colour. I have not colour altered these pictures at all.

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK - alternate view

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK – alternate view

Tessuti Gridlock. The dress - Cerise with contrasting Gridlock elements

Tessuti Gridlock. The dress – Cerise with contrasting Gridlock elements

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK - final

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK – sleeves rolled back.

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK - back view

TESSUTI GRIDLOCK – back view

Tessuti Gridlock - back view

Tessuti Gridlock – back view. Alas cotton linen is very ‘crushable’.

Some detail pictures…

Tessuti Gridlock: lapel, button, piping, topstitching

Tessuti Gridlock: lapel, button, piping, topstitching

Tessuti Gridlock - pocket

Tessuti Gridlock – pocket

Tessuti Gridlock - zipper

Tessuti Gridlock – zipper

Tessuti Gridlock. Shell - construction

Tessuti Gridlock. Shell – construction

Tessuti Gridlock. Lining - construction

Tessuti Gridlock. Lining – construction. Please note I’ve top stitched the lining with contrasting thread!

THANK YOU!
Thank you in particular to Trish, she endured regular random emails from me – which I am sure made little or no sense some days – I even inflicted progress shots on her. Thank you, thank you, thank you. This stopped what was a hard project from also being a long & lonely project.

Thank you also to the Tweeples who checked on my progress and cheered me on, especially Bimble&Pimble with her derby cheers and pom poms.

Good Luck Tessuti Gridlock contestants…

ALL AT SEA WITH TESSUTI & SCRUFFY BADGER…

Hello it’s me – world’s most boring sewing blogger (at least at the moment, Tessuti Gridlock has me in a headlock).

I am STILL working on the never-ending project. I WILL (must) finish soon (I pray). I have nothing of interest to show off today, however all is not lost! You can check out my Desert Island Sewing post over on the ever-delightful Winnie of Scruffy Badger… who I will meet in IRL very very soon!

Desert Island Sewing with Scruffy Badger (aka Winnie)

Desert Island Sewing with Scruffy Badger (aka Winnie)

My epic Tessuti Gridlock project continues. I swear it’s not that epic or amazing but it is taking ages… I don’t know why… I wish I did know… I just want it to be over… (sob)

Tessuti teaser

Tessuti teaser

Ah, I need a holiday… hang on… I seem to recall I am jetting off somewhere soon… London? Paris? Madrid?