Amy Jumpsuit – Closet Case Patterns

Amy Jumpsuit, Closet Case Patterns

Amy Jumpsuit, Closet Case Patterns

The Amy Jumpsuit from Closet Case Patterns.

The Pattern

Currently only available as a PDF, there was a lot of excited chatter on social media when it was released. I purchased it as soon as I saw it, which is increasingly rare for me these days. I had been looking for a similar style jumpsuit and since I hadn’t tried a pattern from Closet Case Patterns, I thought… why not?

Described as:

The Amy Jumpsuit is comfort and breezy elegance all in one tidy, minimalist package. With a figure-skimming silhouette and ultra wide, cropped legs, it’s got the soul of a floaty slip dress in the body of a jumpsuit you’ll never want to take off.

Amy features a flattering V-neckline in front and back, with wide shoulder straps designed to conceal bra straps; an invisible side zipper makes it easy to get on and off. Add function with optional inseam pockets, or cinch the waist with a classic tie belt for a more fitted shape.

Yes… I’ve sewn it in exactly the same fabric as my Myosotis Dress – I bought another 3 metres to stash. However it seemed like a good idea to make the Amy in the same fabric so it never hit the stash pile.

Amy Jumpsuit, Pattern by Closet Case Patterns.

Amy Jumpsuit, Pattern by Closet Case Patterns.

Sizing

I decided to sew size 2 based on the advice from Closet Case Patterns of “We also suggest choosing a size based on your bust measurement; there is a lot of ease built into the waist and hip so you probably don’t have to worry about grading between sizes unless you span more than 3 or more sizes between bust and hip.” I’m close to 3 sizes and I didn’t grade between sizes while tracing.. however I did add 1/4in to the outer leg before I cut into my fabric. Call it ‘hip panic’ if you like.

Amy Jumpsuit, Pattern by Closet Case Patterns.

Amy Jumpsuit, back view

I’ve left off the pockets. I don’t often put pockets into fabrics with a soft drape as I’m unlikely to use them as they pull a garment out of line if you put anything in them. I also decided to put in a slightly longer zip as I was concerned about wriggling these up and over my hips. The pattern launch blog post advised: The pattern has optional pockets and a side seam zipper to make it simple to get on and off; we suggest in the instructions doing a quick baste fit if you’re a straight size or narrow hipped because you might find the zipper unnecessary.

I’m glad I did this as I think it would have been a wiggle without the slightly longer zipper and extra width at the hip.

Fitting

I’m quite long through my torso. I added 1/2inch length to the body. I wish I had added more as it is just long enough (I don’t like living in wedgie world when I bend over so prefer a low-slung crotch for these types of garments). I sewed 1/4inch seams at the straps to add a tiny bit more length.

Despite reading the pattern to verify it has 5/8 inch seam allowances, I somehow managed to sew it together with 1/2 inch seam allowances. I am glad I did as this gave me a tiny bit more length.

I haven’t shortened the legs. The pattern is drafted for 5 foot 6 and I am 5 foot 4. I tend to prefer longer garments so I opted for the unaltered longer length leg.

Amy Jumpsuit, Pattern by Closet Case Patterns.

ladylike moments in the Amy Jumpsuit

Thoughts

The pattern has great instructions for attaching the straps and sewing in the invisible zipper and attaching the lining to it. It’s a very neat and clean finish.

Don’t be like me. Sew a muslin/toile if you are long in the torso or wider through the hips, my approach was not smart… just faster and I managed to adjust along the way.

At first I didn’t like this at all, however I’ve worn it all day and it is very comfortable and practical. My daughters like it on me. I don’t think it’s very flattering on me. However that’s never stopped me wearing something on a casual basis! If it’s comfortable and cool, it’s highly likely to become a summer favourite. I think it will be worn unbelted on very hot summer days.

It’s an easy sew.

The front/back neckline is flattering and the wide straps easily conceal bra straps.

The PDF files come with copy shop files, including the essential (for me) A0 option. I would not have purchased it otherwise.

When the waves wash in, I need two hands to lift my hem out of the way… unlike a dress when I only need one hand to save my outfit from a saltwater drenching. Hey, that’s a lifestyle issue for me!

Belt loops, I’d like belt loops. In these photos the belt has slipped to different positions and changes the look of the jumpsuit, making it more or less flattering. I’d just prefer the belt to stay on one place. I might add some thread loops retrospectively… but then again… I probably won’t.

Amy Jumpsuit, Pattern by Closet Case Patterns.

Contemplating how to avoid soggy hems… and my running sock tan lines…

Pattern: Amy Jumpsuit, Closet Case Patterns
Fabric: Jungle Trail Grey, Pitt Trading, 100% viscose.

This post first appeared on www.sewbusylizzy.com

Yesterday I participated in a local running event called Beach to Brother. I ran from the river mouth you can see in the distance to the top of this mountain called North Brother… I only ran the 10km event (you can ran a marathon or half marathon along the beaches before you tackle the mountain)… but the last 2.5kms felt like a marathon to me… so.many.stairs with 500m of elevation – might not sound like much but it was brutal! I may have complained a lot on the way up to the finish line.

North Brother, Laurieton NSW

North Brother, Laurieton NSW

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Deer & Doe Myosotis – grunge edition

This dress, the Deer & Doe Myositis, has been sewn and seen here, there and everywhere!

Deer & Doe Myosotis - back view

Deer & Doe Myosotis – back view

I admit when it was first released, while the loose fit and shirtwaist style appealed to me, the voluminous ruffles did not.

Myosotis Dress #D0029. Version A

Myosotis Dress #D0029. Version A

The Myosotis is described as: Oversize shirtdress with inseam pockets. Version A has sleeve ruffles and a tiered skirt, version B has plain sleeves and a gathered skirt.

Like many patterns, you might just need to see the right fabric for inspiration to hit.

When I spied this woven viscose at Pitt Trading, I knew I had my Myosotis! It’s more blue/grey in person, and I love the combination of delicate floral and tie dye. It’s understated pretty, you have to look for the detail. I wanted a fabric with plenty of drape so those ruffles swung gently rather than being an overwhelming feature. Interestingly, I sewed my much-loved and worn Deer & Doe Fumeterre skirt in the same fabric in a different colourway!

Jungle trail grey - Pitt Trading. A steal at $5 a metre!

Jungle trail grey – Pitt Trading. A steal at $5 a metre!

I embraced my inner ruffle beast and opted to sew Version A with the tiered skirt and sleeve ruffles. If you are going to do it – go all the way I say!

I cut the smallest size as I was mid way between size 34 – size 36 for my bust and waist. Given the ease, I choose the smaller size.

Deer & Doe Myosotis - back view

Deer & Doe Myosotis – back view

I added an inch to the skirt piece length and was very glad I did! For reference I am 5 foot 4 and it still finishes above my knee. I decided not to add length to the ruffle as I felt it might be too ‘long’ for a ruffle and left it as it was drafted.

I almost left the sleeve ruffles off but in this fabric and print, I actually like them!

Deer & Doe Myosotis Dress in a woven viscose.

Deer & Doe Myosotis Dress in a woven viscose. Sorry I didn’t notice my necklace was hanging out over my dress.

Gathering

Oh my goodness. There is a lot of gathering to do! If you loathe gathering, this may not be the dress pattern for you.

I decided to hem my ruffles before I gathered them and attached them to the skirt and the sleeves.

I also used three rows of gathering stitches as I find this provides the best results for even gathers and ease of sewing.

I use leftover bobbins and spools of thread for my gathering. I always remove my gathering stitcvhes and I find it is a good way to use up those small amounts of cotton that are insufficient for a larger project.

I use leftover bobbins and spools of thread for my gathering. I always remove my gathering stitches and I find it is a good way to use up those small amounts of cotton that are insufficient for a larger project.

I did experiment with gathering with fishing line (zig-zag stitch over fine fishing line as I do for tutu netting) but I don’t recommend it for lighter fabrics such as rayon and viscose. It makes the gathering much messier and harder to control. Never again!

Thoughts

There is a slight dragline from the neckline down towards my bust. I need to consult my fitting books and figure out if I need a forward shoulder adjustment, rounded back or some neckline fix or something else… it’s not terribly obvious but it is there if I look for it and Measure Twice, Cut Once found the same issue with her Myosotis.

I don’t think I have particularly large shoulders however to get this off, I pull it up over my bust and then wiggle it off over my shoulders, even with all the buttons undone. I’d be tempted to put a small zip in the side waist if I make another one to make it a little easier to get in and out of. It doesn’t seem to be a much discussed issue with the pattern, however perhaps my shoulders are proportionally larger than my bust/waist as I have found some RTW dresses difficult to take off for a similar reason.

There is no direction to sew ease stitches to put the sleeves in… so I didn’t and I found they went in first go with no puckers. Winning!

I was concerned this would be a little short and a little too ‘young’ in style for me. However I’m pleasantly surprised by how this has turned out.

I thought it might have a little too much ease and be unflattering… but it turns out I don’t mind how it looks after all.

I think this will be a favourite in my summer wardrobe. Casual, loose, cool to wear and in my favourite colour – what’s not to love!?

And if you are wondering… yes my hair is naturally curly.

Pattern: Deer & Doe Myosotis, size 34
Fabric: Jungle Trail Grey, Pitt Trading. Tempted by buy more…

See more: Instagram

Bonus Crazy Banjo shot!

Bonus crazy Banjo shot! It’s perhaps not the most figure flattering but it’s lovely nevertheless.

I often get asked if I get embarrassed having my photos taken at the beach and if I have to ask people to move out of the way. Actually no… we have lots of beaches where I live and you often have long stretches all to yourself. I’m usually at Nobby’s Beach or Lighthouse with my dogs. I run along the strip between Town Beach and Town Green – and beyond to Settlement Point further up the river. I’m very fortunate – you can see a snapshot of my town and beaches here. Yes, it’s really that pretty.

The Tale of Two Turtleneck – Monroe and Fall

Tessuti Patterns Monroe Turtleneck
vs
Fall Turtleneck Papercut Patterns

On a cold winter day, a snuggly turtleneck holds endless appeal. And this year it has been a cold winter, bitter mornings and colder winds than I’m used to. No bare feet at the beach this winter!

This Aussie winter, Tessuti Fabrics spoilt us with a free pattern – the Monroe turtleneck. It was an obvious choice to try.

Monroe - Tessuti Patterns

Monroe – Tessuti Patterns

The drafting & style of this one reminds me of the pared back & minimalistic Japanese sewing patterns. There is minimal shaping and plenty of ease. I find the neckline to be a little tight and requires a ‘tug’ to pull it over my head. I love the 3/4 sleeve length option.

Monroe - Tessuti Patterns

Monroe – Tessuti Patterns

The length of the body of the Monroe is slightly longer than the Papercut Patterns Fall.

Monroe - Tessuti Patterns

Monroe – Tessuti Patterns. This one has lots of ease – for me.

To contrast, as I already had it in my stash, I also made the Fall Turtleneck from Papercut Patterns. Still a turtleneck with drop shoulders, the Fall however quite a different fit and style to it.

Comparison of the Monroe (left) and Fall (right) armhole and shoulder pattern lines

Comparison of the Monroe (left) and Fall (right) armhole and shoulder pattern lines

The armholes and shoulder lines are much more shaped – and as a result, of course, the sleeves also have more shape to their cap and a noticeable ‘front’ and ‘back’ to the sleeve draft.

papercut_fall1

The neck is much higher and turns over into a delightfully snuggly but not-too-tight turtleneck to ward off those cold winter winds.

Fall Turtleneck - Papercut Patterns

Fall Turtleneck – Papercut Patterns

Thoughts

I found both patterns to be quite short in the body – but the Monroe less so. I would have added length to the Papercut Patterns Fall body however I only ‘just’ had enough to cut the Fall pattern. I originally purchased this piece of merino knit to make a Monroe (Monroe requires 120cm, the Fall 130cm).

I need some new jeans – perhaps some of the high waisted variety… will I succumb to the Persephone Pants fever gripping Instagram? I may one day ‘tuck in’ my tops… who knows!

I’ve worn both turtlenecks quite a lot, perhaps the Monroe more due to the longer body length which is better on the cold days. I think I prefer the Fall for it’s heavier neckline and fit. Then again… it is considerably more expensive than the free Monroe!

Merino leftovers – sew a buff!

I did have long thin off-cuts after cutting out both patterns I turned into a ‘winter buffs’. These have been great on cold mornings when I’m out running (running when frost settles is not fun – especially when frost isn’t something you see very often – if ever!). I’ve been surprised how much I’ve used them – who knew that a random tube of fabric was so useful! Check out the YouTube clips on the multiple ways you can wear them.

Patterns: Monroe Turtleneck, Tessuti Patterns (free) & Fall Turtleneck, Papercut Patterns
Fabric: Merino knit, The Fabric Store, Brisbane

The Spoonflower Grainline Portside Duffel

Aka the Crazy Love Duffel for Giselle

If you are interested in trying Spoonflower – here’s a discount code Lizzy10 to receive 10% off your order – valid until 17 July 2018.

Grainline Portside Duffle, fabric printed by Spoonflower and designed by Giselle Brennan

Grainline Portside Duffle, fabric printed by Spoonflower and designed by Giselle

Now onto blogging business!

When Spoonflower asked if I was interested in their fabric…. of course I said yes! I’d always been curious about this service and I know so have plenty of others.

For those who don’t know what Spoonflower is… from their siteSpoonflower is the world’s first web-based service for custom, on-demand fabric creation, making it possible for individuals to design, print and sell their own fabric, wallpaper and gift wrap. 

So really the limit is your imagination – or wallet.

SpoonflowerDesign

I decided that I had more than enough clothes for myself – and thought it would be a unique opportunity to create something memorable and special for my youngest daughter Giselle. She’s not the dancer. She’s my crazy love girl: kooky, kind and funny as the day is long.

While I could have chosen an existing design, I thought it would be more fun to try out the design element of the service as well – and to capture a moment of Giselle’s creativity and personality.

I walked into her room one evening and immediately loved one of her mad ‘doodles’ that she had stuck to the wall. And that’s when I realised what I wanted to do wih the Spoonflower offer…

I scanned in the doodle and loaded it to the Spoonflower site – incredibly fast and easy.

I chose ‘dogwood denim’ which is a great heavy non-stretch woven fabric, perfect for bag making. I’ve paired it with a black non-stretch denim from the stash. This bag should last for YEARS.

Grainline Portside Duffle, fabric printed by Spoonflower and designed by Giselle Brennan

Grainline Portside Duffle, fabric printed by Spoonflower and designed by Giselle

I love the selvedge on the fabric -complete with details. It’s almost like a old-fashioned silver hallmark.

I was initially concerned about the tiling of the design and how to manage that in the project – however it turned out to be a dream to pattern match & made for some fun positioning on elements of the bag.

Giselle’s Verdict

The coolest thing EVER.

Thank you so much Spoonflower!

I do also have some matching fabric in the organic knit – so watch this space!

Pattern Comments

I’d definitely make this again. In fact I know I will. Very easy to put together. The biggest barrier is finding the notions, d-rings etc. I still haven’t found any swivel-clips locally – hence no shoulder strap yet.

Some of the cutting notes on my pattern pieces didn’t always specify to cut interfacing – however the cutting layout diagrams did. Regardless of this inconsistency, I think it is up to the individual to decide which pieces require interfacing, based on their fabric choice.

The most challenging element of this project was simply the weight of the fabric and the size of the project.

I’ve got the pieces cut out for the Dopp kit & travel pouch to go with these – however I ran out of time & am currently in Perth to run a half marathon relay leg in the Western Australian Marathon (about 4000kms from home). Home to sew soon!

Thoughts

I really enjoyed this process and particularly enjoyed the smile it bought to Giselle’s face. A really special sewing project. Thank you Spoonflower.

Fabric: SpoonflowerinDogwood Denim, design by my daughter Giselle
Pattern: GrainlinePortsideDuffelbag

Fabric supplied by Spoonflower – all opinions my own.

Random

Looking for Australian Sewing Blogs to follow? Check out this list – surprised to find myself on there but delighted to see familiar & some new faces as well.

This post first appeared on www.sewbusylizzy.com

Claudia Dress – Tessuti Patterns

And now for something completely different.. and quite a large departure from my ‘usual’ style – whatever that is these days.  Perhaps not everyone’s cup of tea on me, that’s OK.

Claudia Dress by Tessuti Patterns

Claudia Dress by Tessuti Patterns. Note to self, take hands out of pockets for photos! – ruins line of dress!

I fell in love with this dress when it was released by Tessuti Fabrics.

Described on the Tessuti site as: this stylish, pull-on sundress features narrow shoulder straps, bust darts, stitched-down pockets and above-the-knee side splits with wide hems and topstitched details. Suitable fabrics include medium to heavy weight linens or linen blends and cottons. Not suitable for lightweight or drapey fabrics.

Excuse creases and wrinkles - that's linen for you - and I took photos of four different garments in this lunch break! You have to make use of spare time when you can find it. Let's not talk about the ten surfers that came and jumped into the water as I took the photos...

Excuse creases and wrinkles – that’s linen for you – and I took photos of four different garments in this lunch break! You have to make use of spare time when you can find it. Let’s not talk about the ten surfers that came and jumped into the water as I took the photos… a beautiful late autumn day and the water was warm.

I measure slightly above the Tessuti XXS sizing chart – however this is too large on me. Perhaps I could scale down the pattern when printing if I make it again.

I took up the straps a lot (sorry detail escapes me as I sewed this a few months ago – bad blogger – must blog faster).

Thoughtful design details

The pockets are beautifully inserted. I guess they are called ‘single welt side pockets’? They are much more complex to construct than the simple side pockets you get in many patterns – however the instructions are excellent (illustrated by photographs) and they are sewn to the front of the dress which is a nice detail. I did topstitch in a lighter topstitch thread around the pocket opening but then opted to make all the other topstitching less obvious as I rather like the denim-y plain look of this fabric.

You can perhaps see all the potential top stitching in this line drawing from Tessuti.

Claudia Dress - line drawing courtesty of Tessuti Fabrics

Claudia Dress – line drawing courtesty of Tessuti Fabrics

I love the mitred hem finish. My fabric is so dark it’s hard to see all the details so please visit the Tessuti blog post for more detail shots – and a much better model!

I wish more patterns had thoughtful detaqils like mitred hem finishes. It really does make the dress so much nicer!

I wish more patterns had thoughtful details like mitred hem finishes. It really does make the dress so much nicer!

The neckline is lovely, square with narrow straps.

Claudia Dress, front view

Claudia Dress, front view

The simplicity of this design really appeals to me. It can also be worn with a tshirt on cooler days.

Thoughts

An absolute sack on me. Perhaps not the most figure-flattering shape on me… but does everything have to be? Some days you much want to mooch about in an extraordinarily simple linen dress.

I’m fond of it anyway. I have no desire to ‘cinch it in’ at the waist or belt it in any way. I prefer it as it is.

There is something lovely about slightly crumpled linen sack dresses that makes me feel happy.

A fun pattern, a classic shape and highly wearable on a warm day.

It’s hard to beat a Tessuti PDF Pattern at $12 – and the PDFs come with an A0 copy shop file – always a thumbs up from me!

Pattern: Claudia Dress, Tessuti Fabrics
Fabric: described as “Italian Linen” purchased many many years ago on Goldhawk Road, London

Claudia Dress, Tessuti Patterns

Claudia Dress, Tessuti Patterns

 

Style Arc Ariana Dress

It’s been a while!

So let’s start by talking about the new Style Arc Ariana Dress. I sewed on the last button and photographed this in the evening in the final minutes of sunshine. It’s autumn here but still deliciously warm.

Style Arc Ariana Dress

Style Arc Ariana Dress

This pattern was released last week. I have collected a couple of vintage patterns that are quite similar but for a variety of reasons, this one inspired me to sew immediately and so I did!

Style Arc describes the pattern as follows: You will love this gorgeous button through sun dress. The bodice is beautifully fitted. The shaped bust seams and the shirred back allows this dress to fit perfectly and be comfortable to wear. The skirt has gathers falling from the waist and has two large patch pockets. Not after a dress? You can make this one as a midriff top too!

This was only intended as a ‘test run’ version, I’ve often struggled through Style Arc patterns and instructions – and I wasn’t sure if I would like the style on me. So I raided my stash and came up with this lovely cotton/linen which seemed perfect for the task – and I’ve rather fallen in love with it!

Style Arc Ariana Dress – image courtesy of Style Arc

The Pattern

I purchased the PDF version, which only comes as an A4 print-at-home option. I contacted Lena of Iconic Patterns and she created two A0 pages from the pattern for $10 which I had printed at the copy shop – all done in less than 24 hours. Expensive solution but I was impatient and haven’t felt such an urge to sew for ages! I couldn’t bear to wait for a paper pattern in the post.

Apparently Style Arc will provide an A0 file if you request it. Call me petulant but I don’t think you should have to ask for something which most other independent pattern designers now provide (thanks for listening Carolyn) or that they could provide but chose not to in the initial purchase. It’s absolutely Style Arc’s right to make that business decision but I’m also entitled not to like it. I chose to use resources available to me to be able to print it in an easy-to-use manner – as soon as possible! Thanks Lena.

Style Arc Ariana Dress

Style Arc Ariana Dress – lots of buttons… I think they cost me more than the fabric!

INSTRUCTIONS

Sparse at best! That said, Style Arc are notorious for their very brief instructions. If you can sew and have experience in different garment construction it’s not a bother – if you don’t … it is. So I would not recommend this pattern for beginners.

I found the instructions were adequate but I think many might chose to do some things slightly differently.

I found the instructions to attached the shirred panel to the bodice very brief and I figured out a way to do this by myself.

I didn’t like how the bodice was attached to the skirt – or at least the way I read them. perhaps style Arc assume you will figure out the best way to do so – rather than giving you a method. The way the shirring panel was created meant I had to do some unpicking to obtain a neat result on the inside of the bodice. I sewed the skirt to the outer bodice and then slip stitched in the lining into place along the waistline.

SHIRRING

Style Arc Ariana Dress - back view

A shirred back panel. Easy to create IF you know how!

If you are hoping to find detailed shirring instructions in this pattern – you won’t. There are some diagrams but they don’t actually tell you “how to shirr”. You need to figure that bit out by yourself.

I have shirred before but if you are looking for helpful hints, this Craftsy post helps. Google and YouTube will be your sewing friends if you have never shirred before.

Style Arc Ariana Dress - bodice back

Style Arc Ariana Dress – my shirring is not perfect but I only intended this to be a ‘test run’ and experimented a bit!

I find it impossible shirr with my front-loading bobbin case fancy-pants Bernina. Instead I borrow my daughter’s basic Singer machine that has a top-loading bobbin. I hand-wind the shirring elastic onto the bobbin and increase the stitch length. I also find gently providing some tension at the back of the fabric as it goes under the sewing foot helps pull the fabric and result in a more even and neat shirr. That said, I think the shirring experience varies vastly from machine to machine – do a test run first… the panel has 29 rows of shirring!

POCKETS

It has large patch pockets however I didn’t have quite enough fabric to make pockets so I opted to leave them off. I think it would be a lovely feature in a solid linen.

LIKES

  • A classic sundress.
  • It’s very comfortable. Not too fitted on me but not a shapeless sack.
  • Not too many pieces and quite quick to construct… if you can get yourself through the brief instructions and figure out a few construction issues.
  • Some might be deterred by the shirring. However it is a narrow panel and it makes the bodice fit nicely. I like it.
  • The bodice is fully lined. I chose to use the shell fabric as the lining. Many of the other patterns I have considered have a facing to finish the top edge. I think I might try one to see how it compares.
Style Arc Ariana Dress - bodice lining

Style Arc Ariana Dress – bodice lining. The other bonus of having the lining and shell the same – I could choose which pieces to use on the outside and avoid ‘flower’ bewb’

  • I like the neckline shape and strap placement.

DISLIKES

  • Construction as per instructions. I would approach construction slightly differently next time around.
  • A4 PDF pattern or a paper pattern and having to wait impatiently for delivery. I believe US customers can purchase copy shop PDFs from Amazon.

DETAILS

Pattern: Style Arc Ariana Dress, can be purchased as a paper or PDF version. I sewed a straight size 6 with no alterations.
Fabric: Cotton/Linen blend – Still available online – my piece was a remnant bin find for $12 for a 1.7m piece.

Style Arc Ariana Dress

Also excellent for clambering over rocks

I’ve been absent from ‘blog land’ for quite some time – for a range of reasons. As you can see, I’m still here and kicking despite last year’s massive health crisis. I’ve also sewn quite a few other garments and knitted a jumper… blog posts to come… sooner rather than later I hope. More about my damaged carotid artery adventures later.

Style Arc Ariana Dress

Style Arc Ariana Dress

… or there is the Jessica Dress

I’ve almost purchased the Mimi G Jessica Dress several times.

At the moment Mimi G is giving away her Jessica Dress pattern which is quite similar to this dress in many ways. You do need to sign up to her database in order to receive an email to download a copy. I’m not sure how long this offer lasts for… so delay at your peril. It has bodice facings and the skirt button front is looks like it is finished differently. Busy Lizzie (another sewing blogger & friend) recently posted her Jessica Dress on instagram which she had added a shirred panel to. Bonus – gorgeous chevron stripe bodice! I downloaded this pattern today – it comes with an A0 option.

This blog post first appeared on http://www.sewbusylizzy.com

Wrapped in Flowers – maxi wrap dress Vogue 9251

I had a maxi wrap dress in my head… and here it is… Vogue 9251.

This is a maxi length version of Vogue 9251 with flutter sleeves.

The rayon fabric has lots of drape and is very fluid, even in a strong late afternoon breeze, it is a delight to wear.

I finished this dress length midway between the midi and the maxi length on the Vogue pattern… I’m 5 foot 4 for reference.

I underlined the bodice in white lawn. I d cured to do this after an Instagram comment from AnnaKatherine who has also sewn a dress in this fabric. It is a fine lightweight rayon and it is bearing a lot of weight in that long, long skirt and the fabric is slightly sheer.

I used my Bernina rolled hem foot to hem the sleeves. I hand basted the bodice and underlining together and then used this fabulous technique to baste my bodice darts. This kept the fabrics together beautifully. Try it, it’s easy & very neat!

I found this dress a little too roomy… I tried stitching elastic to the inside of bias tape finish on the neckline (I had to get creative as I’d trimmed the seams). This is a technique I picked up in a Claire Shaeffer couture book. I used it successfully on my Flora dress.  Even with a tiniest bit of tension I didn’t like it. There’s a millions reasons this was a bad idea BUT it was fun trying it. I didn’t like it. So I unpicked it and tried something else. I strangely enjoy experimenting and trying new things, even when they don’t work.


I unpicked the neckline again and then placed two small back neck darts in the neckline and this improved the fit. Thanks to the print you can’t really see those darts at all. I do wish that this pattern went down to a size 6.

I love this dress and worn it a few times already. Yes, it’s a bright burst of colour… but it’s a dress that makes me feel happy and noone can argue with the virtue of happy wardrobe choices.

Life: still fairly restricted activity wise but hanging in there… less than two weeks until my MRI and CT scans in Sydney. Hooray. Staying positive.Pattern: Vogue 9251. Size 8.
Fabric: Rayon from Spotlight Australia. I bought the last of the roll at my store, last year. Sorry!