Ogden Cami Dress

A quick holiday post, from the spectacular Bruny Island, Tasmania, Australia.

I wasn't 'in love' with this fabric when I purchased it, just its drape. Now it's sewn up I rather love the print

I wasn’t ‘in love’ with this fabric when I purchased it, just its drape. Now it’s sewn up I rather love the print

I suspect the True Bias Ogden Cami may be a popular Australian summer sewing pattern with many. I think the sleeveless, casual style & being a pattern for ‘wovens’ makes it perfect for steamy summer days.

This is just another experiment for yet another Ogden Cami Dress ‘hack’ that have been topping up everywhere. Far from perfect but I’ve worn it a few times already, so perhaps a success anyway!

I use the term ‘hack’ loosely. No pattern drafting going on here.

I simply extended the Ogden Cami hemline, flaring it out about 1/2inch on either side from about 1 inch below the armhole.

Odgen Cami Dress

Odgen Cami Dress

I flared the lining piece at the sides I don’t think I would I worry about this modification next time as the cinching in of the waist achieve that soft overlay flare anyway.

I attached the lining to the outside of the cami bodice rather than the inside, treating it like an overlay rather than a lining.

I decided where I wanted my waistline to be and allowed for a slight blouson effect.

Odgen Cami Dress

Odgen Cami Dress

To create the waistline, I attached bias tape to the inside of the dress. I first stitched along the inside of the bias tape, along the fold line. I pressed it downwards and edge stitched along the other edge of the bias tape.

Ogden Cami dress - internal - waist elasticity casing & hem.

Ogden Cami dress – internal – waist elasticity casing & hem.

I left a stitching gap and then threaded some 1/4in elastic into the bias tape channel.

I turned up the overlay and dress hemlines with more bias tape – and hand stitched the hems in place.

Nothing fancy but it’s quite a cute little dress for summer.

Pattern: True Bias Ogden Cami, modified

Fabric: rayon/linen blend fabric on Lincraft

Location: water shots at Jetty Beach on route to the Cape Bruny Lighthouse, Tasmania. An incredible day in an amazing place in the world. Not overly ‘touristy’ just divinely beautiful, unspoilt & the journey ‘off the beaten track’ is well worth the effort.

A dress: Vintage Vogue 8974…

Or when everything old is new again… (and a recent make!)

A floral vintage Vogue Patterns 8974

A floral vintage Vogue Patterns 8974

I’m not really a vintage gal. It doesn’t seem to fit with my casual aesthetic and I think it would be a little odd in my workwear wardrobe which tends to be quite modern and fitted.

However that doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate it on others or have the odd craving for a bit of old-fashioned pretty. And not every interpretation of a vintage pattern needs to be ‘vintage’. Perhaps that is why I have been drawn to a couple of the Vintage Vogue re-issue patterns of late.

I’ve been looking for a dress pattern for three metres of gorgeous black bamboo linen I got at East Coast Fabric with Jen and Lizzie when I was in Brisbane in October.

I’m after a longline, sleek summer dress but with a striking design detail to relieve the severity of a lot of black fabric.

Amid my searching I came across Vogue 8974, a design from 1949. This hasn’t been made much (in Blogland at any rate), I suspect the need for a strapless bra and the a-line skirt (rather than a generous gathered or pleated skirt of the 1950s era) has let it loll in the back of the catalogue, waiting to be discovered.

Vogue 8974 pattern art - courtesy of Vogue Patterns

Vogue 8974 pattern art – courtesy of Vogue Patterns

I really love the jacket as well. I’m not really a matchy-matchy girl so I’ve just made the dress. I think the jacket would be a very cute project in the future!

CONSTRUCTION

It’s a relatively simple make. The pattern construction has a very cool snap closure at the side waist. While I loved the idea of this, I decided to replace it with a zip. I find dresses with side closures that don’t release all the way to the armhole incredibly difficult to pull off over my shoulders. I almost dislocate my shoulders getting them off. I don’t know if my shoulders are weirdly larger in comparison to my rib cage or it’s simply that I’m not the world’s greatest contortionist. Either way, I don’t enjoy clothes that require a can opener to get in and out of.

Vintage Vogue 8974

Vogue 8974 line art, courtesy of Vogue Patterns

I added a lining to the bodice as the linen is slightly sheer on the white areas of the print. I didn’t worry about lining the skirt as it hangs away from my body and I wanted to keep it light and airy as linen is so cool to wear in summer.

I think I could shorten the bust darts a little.

The front bodice neckline is a little fiddly to sew but pinning and patience gets you through. I often add a little length to a bodice, however I left this one as drafted and it seems to be the right length on me.

The bodice has lovely french darts and a marvelous neckline.

The pattern doesn’t direct you to interface the facing pieces for the bodice, which I thought was odd so I added this.

I omitted the buttons as I don’t think this fabric needs embellishment.

FIT

It’s a tricky one. I made the size 6. People talk about the Big 4 having too much ease etc etc. I’ve often seen people make certain sizes based on this theory and then have a disaster make.

Refer to the body measurements on the envelope by all means. I ALWAYS chose my size and grade between sizes based on the FINISHED measurements on the pattern paper. It’s always interesting to compare the envelope body measurements to the finished measurements and see how much ease they are allowing. I would recommend chosing your size based on the ease that you prefer. This may be more or less depending on the style of garment.

Vogue 8974 - side view

Vogue 8974 – side view

I sewed this up and was pretty happy with everything EXCEPT the bodice upper edge sat away from my body from my mid upper bust and around under my armpits. While it looked OK and my family couldn’t see what I thought was so odd… I felt like ‘bewbs in an icecream sundae glass’. That’s the best description I can come up with 🙂 You can still see some of this gaping at the side (see below) and I’m not 100% pleased with the fit above my bust either. Perhaps a firmer fabric would be less likely to crease above my bust. So maybe the bamboo linen is not destined to be a Vogue 8974. We will see.

Vintage Vogue 8974

Vintage Vogue 8974

As the front slopes down to the back, it isn’t just a matter of running in the sides to pull it in and make it fit (no I don’t muslin much… I like to think of myself as an eternal optimist and sew with that attitude). As I was mid-make, taking it in at the sides was my only option and I pulled more in from the back on an angle to make it work. This in turn messed up my lovely neat-as-a-pin facings which was a little disappointing. Yes, very dodgy but only you, me and few other thousand readers know this – and I don’t wear my dresses inside out. So my secret is safe 🙂

I had to take at least 2 inches off the straps. For some reason you attach the straps to the back bodice and then adjust them at the front. The front bodice is quite fiddly and I think it would be simpler to adjust the straps at the back instead if I make this again.

A pretty cross-over back strap detail.

A pretty cross-over back strap detail. The rarely seen tatto- you’re welcome.

I took 3 inches off the length (I am 5 foot 4) and turned the hem up with some blue bias tape from the stash. I hand stitched the hem, I love the finish of a handsewn hem.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Love this design. It feels modern and feminine without being fussy. I’m extremely tempted to make it again… I just need to figure out how to best deal with the gaping at the upper bodice and underarms. Or maybe it’s meant for someone with more curves than me!

It reminds me a lot of the Sewaholic Lonsdale which perhaps I should also revisit.

If you have any suggestions on fitting or another dress pattern I should try along these lines… I’d love to hear it!

Pattern: Vogue 8974
Fabric: Linen from The Fabric Store, Brisbane (purchased a couple of years ago). Blue, khaki, white and splogdes of yellow, I adore this colour combination.
Also see: See Carmen Sew | The Fold Line | Silver Cat Tea Party

 

Photobombed by a pelican

Photobombed by a pelican in my lunchbreak.

It’s quite odd posting my projects out of order. Seeing my hair change lengths and colours. It’s much healthier now than a year or so ago.

This time last year, I cut off my nails as they kept snapping and my hair was thinning and breaking for no apparent reason… actually I think it was mainly two things… too much stress, exhaustion and no rest…  It was the day I put my hair up in the ponytail and a large amount of it simply snapped off around the hairband, I realised something had to give… I changed some things and I feel much better a year on. So all’s well that ends well.

Vogue 1499 – playing with stripes

I’ve had a few of these projects in the last 12 months, the things that just miss the mark. While I’m not ‘in love’ with this dress, I don’t dislike it terribly. It’s a fun design and I enjoyed making it.

Vogue 1499, Anne Klein design, side view

OK but not quite right – fit or style wise

While I used to berate myself for wasting fabric, bad choices and so on… I don’t feel that way any more. Every garment or project contains a lesson in itself, whether it is better understanding fabric choices, personal style, new construction methods and so on.

I’ve been on the hunt for some ‘pretty’ dress patterns. For casual ‘weekend’ clothes I prefer loose t-shirts, simple dresses, jeans, maxi skirts and so on. However the rest of my wardrobe is work/event/going-out and is quite different and I’ve been looking for dress patterns to refresh that part of my wardrobe.

I started with Vogue 1499, an Anne Klein design. Like many sewers, I’ve drawn to sewing with stripes. The fun you have stripe matching and the way stripes can quite alter your silhouette is endlessly fun.

The dress is described by Vogue as: Lined dress (partially cut on crosswise grain) has fitted bodice, cap sleeves, side-front and side-back seams, pleated skirt, and invisible back zipper. Note: No provisions provided for above waist adjustment.

Vogue 1499, Anne Klein design

Vogue 1499, Anne Klein design. Image from Vogue Patterns

While this double ikat (I think that is what is called when the stripes run both directions) is quite lovely, I think like the Burda shirt, the colour & design is just all wrong for me.

The fabric has been sitting in my stash for a couple of years so I was happy to use it.

The dress bodice and it’s cap sleeves are lined with a cotton lawn and I used bemsilk for the skirt lining. The skirt has separate pattern pieces to the pleated outer skirt and is a loose a-line shape.

I did iron this – however it got slightly crushed in the car driving into town to take some rushed photos after work. Plus I think the seat belt put a huge crease in the front bodice (these are compulsory in Australia). We had to try a few spots in the CBD to escape the ever-present wind at the moment.

What’s not quite right for me

I also think that this design would have looked much better in a smaller stripe. I’ve taken a pattern and sewn it in a very casual fabric and not quite achieved my usual ‘casual’ style or a dressy dress. Such is life!

The fit seemed quite roomy and I ended up having to unpick the neckline, add two back neck darts. The front bodice is still a little large at the neckline.

Vogue 1499, Anne Klein design, back view

I spent some time matching those stripes and was quite pleased with the result! It was a very windy afternoon unfortunately!

The sewn down pleats seem to length my already long torso and I am considering unpicking them.

The waistline, despite all those directional stripes, isn’t as flattering as I hoped. It seems to thicken my waist.

Maybe my shoulders are scrawny but the cap sleeves also seem a little too large.

Vogue 1499, Anne Klein design, front view

My waist seems to go on forever! Not sure if unpicking the sewn-down pleats would help.

Conclusion

It is an easy sew and spending some time, hand sewing some elements results in a really nice finish.

Despite not being my ‘dream dress’, I think it’s a lovely pattern and would be delightful on others. The bodice lines and the nice little bust darts are really lovely.

I think using some solid colour blocking on the side panels, rather than using stripes, could potentially look fabulous combined with a print.

I’ve since made Vogue 8997 and LOVE it so that’s coming to the blog very soon.

Pattern: Vogue 1499
Fabric: Cotton Ikat from Spotlight Australia
Also see: Amanda’s Adventures in Sewing | Pattern Review

Papercut Adrift Dress – a birthday dress

or When You Almost Exactly Copy The Pattern Envelope…

I had this lovely spotty rayon fabric in the stash and while I tried to resist more or less replicating the Papercut Patterns version, I couldn’t resist this pattern/fabric combination. My Grainline Alder Dress was made from the same fabric and has been a much-loved summer dress… so here we are with a new summer dress!

Hello Papercut Adrift Dress

Papercut Adrift Dress - front view

Papercut Adrift Dress – front view

This pattern comes with a skirt and dress variation. Obviously this is the dress. The skirt option has front and back waist darts and a waistband.

Described by Papercut as… A feminine dress for warm summer days. Features include gently ruffled sleeves and hemline, wrap skirt, bust darts and gathered waist with additional wrap skirt option. The wrap-around skirt option features a waistband with front and back darts.

CONSTRUCTION

Very simple. The pieces went together beautifully.

Skirt Construction

I did hit a snag as I traced the pattern pieces and constructed the garment without much (any) reference to the instructions – other than a cursory glance.

When I went to fit the bodice to the skirt, they did not match at all… after a ‘what is wrong with me’ message to ever-helpful Papercut team, it turns out the skirt pattern pieces have darts marked on them but do not indicate it is for the skirt option only.

So if you are a derp-head like me and don’t always reference instructions, then you will hit a snag. Darts are only for the skirt option – this is not indicated on the pattern sheet. Once I unpicked the skirt darts, it went together perfectly.

The instructions (when I did read them) have you attached the flounce/frill to the skirt pieces and then sew the front and back pieces together. I chose to sew the front/back skirt pieces together. Then the flounce pieces together. Then I attached the flounce as one piece to the skirt pieces. I’m sure that one continuous seam doesn’t make ‘that’ much difference to the overall flow of the flounce… but I would prefer to construct the skirt that way.

You do need to do the skirt hem before you attach it to the bodice as the front flounces are sewn into the waist seam. On the bright side, you won’t have a project hanging about that just requires a hem. This one forces you to hem mid project!

Papercut Adrift Dress - back view

Papercut Adrift Dress – back view

Seam Allowances

As the seam allowances are only 1/2 inch, I think it’s best to neaten all your edges before you sew the seams. In some cases the instructions do tell you to overlock before you sew the seam. In other cases not. Having sew a few Papercut Patterns I knew this was a issue and overlocked most things before I sewed the seams. I chose to overlock the skirt/flounce edges together after sewing the seam.

I find overlocking 1/2 inch seams a little more fiddly (after sewing a seam) and the results not as neat as those with a larger seam allowance. Some fabrics might distort while overlocking – so be mindful of that.

Neck facing

The instructions also have you top stitch the neck facing down. I’ve chosen to catch stitch it down at the shoulder seams and this has not been a problem.

Hems

The skirt and sleeve hems are finished with a narrow hem.

Papercut Adrift Dress - side view

Papercut Adrift Dress – side view (just befor birthday lunch at a local vineyard)

Waist tie

I did insert cord as instructed but didn’t like the look.  So I made a thin cord of self fabric instead. I think next time I will try inserting elastic as I prefer as elastic gathers in a skirt at the waist – much more tidy. This would also mean no buttonholes at the waist for the cord.

The cord and fabric cord doesn’t slide as easily and I tend to arrange the gathers to be more evenly spaced.

I also found having a white cord hanging at my waist amongst the flounce at my waist was a bit visually messy. Perhaps with a more patterned/floral fabric, the cord wouldn’t bother me – it all comes down to fabric choice and pattern.

THOUGHTS

I do rather love this.

A fairly simple sew – provided you have patience with attaching curved flounces and rather endless curved narrow hems.

Cute and fun. Feminine without being twee.

I love the sleeve/skirt flounces and the loose fit of the garment.

It’s best suited (in my opinion) for fabrics with some soft drape.

I thought I might add a little to the bodice length next time… I am 5 foot 4 but very long through the torso. Then again, the slightly raised waistline makes my legs look long when I wear heels… might not be such a bad thing? 🙂

Papercut Adrift Dress - sleeves

Papercut Adrift Dress – sleeves

I’m surprised we haven’t seen more of these on blogs and social media, it’s a nice little summer dress.

Oh and it’s the ‘birthday dress’… because I wore it today for the first time, took photos after lunch and it’s my birthday… counts as a birthday dress… yes?

Pattern: Papercut Adrift Dress, XXS
Fabric: Rayon (woven), Spotlight (Australia). Purchased during a clearance sale for $3!
Shoes: Jo Mercer
All purchased by me.

Also see: Carly in Stitches  |  tagged Instagram posts

 

This post first appeared on www.sewbusylizzy.com

Alix Dress, By Hand London (the tester version)

This is the ‘tester’ version of the Alix Dress from By Hand London. I haven’t made up the newly released version.

Alix Dress - the tester version from By Hand London

Alix Dress – the tester version from By Hand London

It is described as: “ A high-waisted prairie dress with a V-neck yoke, inset waistband, tie back belt and a full skirt, pleated at centre front and back. And best of all, no zipper! With long, billowing raglan sleeves secured at the wrist with a delicate elasticated cuff and three skirt length options (& everything in between!)”. It’s got a 70s vibe which is one of my favourite eras. I made the tester UK 6 / US 2 size.

When I went to sew this dress up, the feedback from the earlier testers was the pleats were a little ‘pointy’ on smaller bust sizes and perhaps using gathers instead of the pleats might be worth trying.

I did this. However I think the gathers need to be spread over a larger distance than the pleat space as I ended up with a ‘puff’ of fabric directly under my bust with nowhere for it to go. You can see this below on the left hand side of the image.

The released pattern has been changed to have an option to change the pleat into a gather and from the purple sample on the By Hand London website, the gather has been eased across a greater distance on the inset waistband than I did here. That should remove the ‘puff’ of fabric issue.

It’s a shame as the general bust fit is OK on me and the neckline is lovely. Low but it is OK on my build.

Alix Dress, By Hand London

Alix Dress, By Hand London

I thought there was a considerable amount of easing to get the front bodice piece to fit into the arm. I think it is why there is bubbling above the bust along the armhole line. It’s not terrible but I would prefer a smoother fit. And I dare say I’ve put up with worse in RTW before I started sewing.

The fit does change depending on my bra choice as you would expect but that bubbling the upper bust remains. I have had a lot of compliments when I have worn it (from the non-sewing non-fit people in my life). Perhaps those people don’t zoom in on my bust zone!

I had to reduce the pleats in order to get the skirt piece to fit onto the inset waistband. I’m going to have to cut out the pattern again to see if this was some sort of idiot pattern cutting accident as apparently I was alone in this issue.

alix-11

I don’t believe there have been many changes to the pattern I tested (other than the pleat to a gather option) and apparently my issues with the bust and upper bust fit were limited to me, the feedback on fit was generally very happy. Maybe I’m just becoming too fussy, I sewed it up too fast or my bust/upper bust is weird!

Despite all my issues, the print of the fabric hides many sins, I had to zoom in with the camera to capture the issues as once you step back the fabric puffs and bubbles seem to disappear. I have worn this dress a few times in the last few weeks as the rayon is cool to wear and I quite like long sleeve for a change. I’m not a massive fan of elastic in my wrist cuffs but it’s not a huge issue.

I made the mini dress version and while it is short, it is not self-consciously so – you should note I am 5 foot 4 or 164cm tall.

This dress has no buttons, zips etc. It simply slips over your head and ties pull the dress in for a neater fit.

The perfect accessory - an old happy greyhound

The perfect accessory – an old happy greyhound. Banjo was beetling around off-the-leash at his usual furious pace!

I’ve got lots of dresses I would like to make this summer but right now I need some sleeveless ones sooner rather than later!

Dress: Alix Dress, By Hand London (tester version), size sewn UK 6 / US 2.
Fabric: Woven rayon from Fantazia Fabricland, Tweed Heads QLD
Also See: Adventures of a Young Seamstress | Lily Sage & Co | Sewn by Ashley | Sweet Shard | Sew 2 Pro |

And this is what the first splash of cold water feels like some days…

Alix Dress, By Hand London

Alix Dress, By Hand London

Thank you all so much on your feedback on my last few posts. My work life has been exceptionally busy and I’ve been ‘on the road’ a few times in the last few weeks – however I have read them all and will respond as soon as I can!

Tunic Bible Winner…

Wow thanks to your huge response on the Tunic Bible giveaway – unfortunately there is only one winner… and (determined by random number generator) the winner of the Tunic Bible winner is jaelh!

The Tunic Bible

The Tunic Bible

You can grab a copy of the Tunic Bible at C&T Publishing – all new customers receive a 30% discount by signing up on their website and the ebook is now available. Or of course there is also Amazon and other retailers.

Note: for this post I received a digital copy of the book The Tunic Bible from C&T Publishing to review. All opinions my own.

The Tunic Bible – a review & giveaway (part 1)

(Giveaway now closed)

My sewing is behind schedule. As much as I don’t like to think the my life requires a schedule, the simple reality is when you are working fulltime with kids and a hobby blog… a degree of planning is necessary!

Lately my life has been dedicated to juggling a fulltime job and my eldest daughter’s very busy dance schedule and her participation in the local dance eisteddfod. More about the dancing & dancewear in another post – as I ended up making more than ‘just’ a tutu!

Today I’m here to review the new book The Tunic Bible: One Pattern, Interchangeable Pieces, Ready-to-Wear Results by Sarah Gunn and Julie Starr.

Julie Starr is well known for her gorgeous contributions to Pattern Review and Sarah Gunn needs little introduction to the online sewing world courtesy of her blog Goodbye Valentino and Mood Sewing Network – in fact she was one of the first sewing bloggers I discovered. Together they have written The Tunic Bible, a huge achievement and exciting development for them both! Congratulations.

Julie Starr and Sarah Gunn, authors of The Tunic Bible

Julie Starr and Sarah Gunn, authors of The Tunic Bible

I’m in the middle of making up my ‘tunic’ from this book and decided not to rush and to share it on a separate post because…

  1. I like to finish my project thoughtfully and neatly; and
  2. focus on the book.

I think it’s easy to just look at garment and not really know what you might be purchasing when you buy a book on impulse after seeing one garment from it.

I’ve been provided with a digital copy to review. I confess I do find it difficult to read a book online or on my ipad so I ended up printing it out in mini booklet form so I could get a general sense of the layout and feel. The paper copy is still on it’s way

MY FIRST IMPRESSIONS

Now like many of you I suspect, I thought… how on earth do you write a book about tunics? I thought that because my ‘notion’ of a tunic is a garment that finishes at upper to mid thigh, a placket style neckline – with or without sleeves. And as a general rule – modest.

And yes, the tunic as you know it is definitely this book… alongside a seemingly endless array of tunic, and dresses – mini/maxi in this book.

the-cover

or if you prefer to see them on ‘real’ people…

Sarah Gunn & Julie Staff (centre) ... that long print maxi dress sold me on the versatility of 'the tunic' if only I could find suitable fabric.

Sarah Gunn & Julie Staff (centre) … that long print maxi dress sold me on the versatility of ‘the tunic’ if only I could find suitable fabric.

WHAT’S COVERED

I’ve decided to include the Contents page from my ‘review copy’ so you get a good overview of what is covered in this book.

contents-page

Contents: The Tunic Bible by Sarah Gunn & Julie Starr

 

The books does provide you with a full overview of all the possible options – and each version of the ‘tunic’ is accompanied by a description of the different style ‘elements’ that have been used as well as the type of fabric, trimming and embellishment.

There is a array of necklines and collar types to consider, sleeves (including a puffed and split sleeve), fitted vs loose silhouettes and how to embellish and trim your tunic. They also cover suitable types of fabrics – the options range from silk and linen to lace and knit options.

There is also a gallery of home sewing personalities who have made up a wide range of ‘tunics’ in all lengths, fits and fabrics. The book itself is packed with a huge range of different tunics – there must have been A LOT of sewing going on during the making of this book! I believe Sarah and Julie sewed approximately 60 tunics between them.

Tunics from The Tunic Bible by Sarah Gunn & Julie Starr

There’s more to a tunic than meets the eye

CONSTRUCTION

The pattern is provided full-size on a tear-out jumbo sized sheet. Hooray for not printing off A4 sheets and sticking them together!

There is a ‘general assembly order’ provided with an order of construction provided and also a seam finishing order.The construction instructions to me are more than adequate – however if you are an absolutely beginner you make want to google a few things BUT if you have basic sewing knowledge the book provides adequate guidance through the contruction of all the different elements: the types of plackets, collar finishes (including a ruffle of course – I would expect nothing less from Sarah!).

I wouldn’t say that there is ‘fitting’ advice in this book – other than the suggestion to make a muslin, what to check and a resource list on where to source support for alterations. I think this is adequate as it is not sold as a tunic fitting bible and fitting is such a varied and complex area unto itself.

RESOURCES

The book concludes with a range of physical (largely US based) and online fabric & trim stores, Sewing and alterations resources, online classes and links as well as sewing with speciality fabrics.

SIZING

I’ve been guilty of not to think to include sizing in my book reviews – and I always should. I’ve made the mistake of buying patterns that I fall outside the range of and I think it’s easy enough to do! So The Tunic Bible covers the following size range.

  • Begins at XS: Bust 33in/84cm, waist 28in/71cm, hip 35.5in/90cm
  • Finishes at XXL: 47in/121cm, waist 43in/109cm, hip 49.5in/126cm

FINAL THOUGHTS

I admit to being somewhat skeptical about 100+ pages on tunics – and I’m delighted that my skepticism was unfounded. I found the book interesting and inspiring – and a nice change from pretty dresses (as much as we all love them – me included).

There is a truckload of visual inspiration due to the large number of photographs and tunics that have been constructed for this book. This comprises more than half of the book – and reminder being dedicated to the construction of the tunic elements (yes, there are a lot of options!).

I think it may be a good starting point for someone who wants to experiment with a fairly simple base pattern to try a range of fabrics, trims and let their imagination run wild. The book does offer you a range of options to consider to make a unique garment each time.

For me, I can see a few simple tunic shift dresses for summer and perhaps a floaty version with sleeves as a beach cover-up. I look forward to seeing the book in person.

GIVEAWAY

Now the giveaway – every stop of the blog tour has a copy to giveaway. Note it will be a hard copy for the US-based winners and an electronic copy for those based outside the US.
Would you like a copy? To go in the lucky draw, leave a comment below and you might just win yourself your own Tunic Bible (courtesy of C&T Publishing). The lucky winner will be announced October 11! Where else can you enter the draw?
Or if you can’t wait, you can grab one at C&T Publishing – all new customers receive a 30% discount by signing up on their website and the ebook is now available.

Note: for this post I received a digital copy of the book The Tunic Bible from C&T Publishing to review. All opinions my own.

This post first appeared on www.sewbusylizzy.com