If Romy was a dress


Romy dress, front view.

It wasn’t exactly what I had in mind… but sometimes you just gotta roll with what you’ve created and make it work. These photos taken on my back deck after a work-from-home day and in the midst of a horrendously disruptive and dusty kitchen demolition project.

I’m extremely weary. Christmas, a very large tree branch landing on my roof and cracking tiles, back to work and a kitchen demolition/renovation … it’s been a hectic few weeks. So if this lacks detail… or fails to make sense… I apologise.

“If Romy Was A Dress” she might have been a Gorman. This dress style is reminiscent of the iconic Australian brand which favours simple dress shapes which let the fabric sing – which are often artist collaborations. Google ‘Gorman Afternoon Tea Dress’ to see what inspired this dress.

The Tessuti Romy Top has been popular as a ‘dress hack‘ and it’s easy to see why. If Lisa’s gorgeous version a few year back wasn’t enough to seduce you – then the floaty summer dresses of late in stores might now.

Inspired by a Gorman dress from a few season ago, when I spied this delicious textural domino check at Minerva’s Bower I jumped at the opportunity to turn an idea buzzing around in my head into reality.

It’s more cream than white ‘in real life’ – link to site provided below.

I had Romy in my stash and had made it in a linen remnant when it was first released. The fit was good and I like how it’s a slip-on top with no zipper/buttons required. Sorry my photo opportunities and blogging is sorely lacking these days!

So I tried on my top, decided where I would like my dress waistline to be and added 1/2 inch seam allowance.

I only lined the bodice as I knew the waist ease would make the skirt voluminous enough.
I hand stitched the lining to the waist seam. I love a tidy finish.

I used the outer bodice pieces as the lining pieces. I lined it with black lawn as the shepherds check is fairly textured and two layers would have added too much structure to the garment which already was going to have significant ease around the waist.

Inspired by the first Romy dress hack, I also used grosgrain ribbon for my shoulder straps. I made this during lockdown so I was just lucky to have some in my ‘stash’ to use.

Romy dress, back view

For the skirt, I used all of the remaining length, cut it in half lengthwise, sewed the two pieces together (selvedge a to selvedge a) and then gathered the full width of the fabric onto the bodice. I hand stitched a tiny hem to get the most out if the fabric length.

A narrow hand-stitched hem.

I wished I’d purchased 2m or slightly more instead of 1.75cm and this would be a tiny bit longer… but hindsight is a wonderful thing and the dress is lovely nevertheless. So after cursing myself for several months… I’ve forgiven it for my Scrooge-like purchasing and have finally decided I like it after all! How the checks met between the bodice and skirt does irritate me a little – but I’m learning to embrace my frugal habits and what comes with them!

If you put your hands on your waist… it doesn’t look quite as roomy as Romy can be!

I’ve well and truly embraced dresses with lots of ease, perfect for humid summer days… and just feeling comfortable and relaxed in, I struggle to imagine reverting to fitted styles now. Perhaps it’s the Covid lockdown, work-from-home lifestyle. Maybe it’s my age. Either way… I’m comfortable and relaxed – and happier.

Romy dress, side view – if you are seeking a waist-enhancing frock… this may not be for you!

Pattern: Romy Top, Tessuti Patterns

Fabric: Domino Check, Minerva’s Bower

4 thoughts on “If Romy was a dress

  1. Bloody hell. Not surprised you are beat! What’s not to love about a mono checked dress. It looks gorgeous on you and so fabulously finished on the inside too!

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