A Tencel Denim Japanese Jumpsuit? Onesie?

Or that time I channeled my inner denim-clad Gumby

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit – just mucking around on Photoshop app on my phone one night – better (unfiltered – perhaps not better!) images follow!

I’ve missed just sewing things for the heck of it. Like so many of us, I am very time poor so I had tried to sew sensible/practical stuff to make the most economical of my time spent sewing.

Turns out, for me, that’s a bit of an inspiration killer. So I’ve decided to revert to my former sewing self and sew the things that tickle my fancy or intrigue me. In all honesty I tend to wear my slightly off-kilter garments the most. Plus I sew because it relaxes me, my yoga is sewing. I make no apologies for that.

And lately it was this that intrigued me. Japanese pattern books are back!

Japanese sewing book

I fell in love with this book a few visits ago to Kinokunya (Sydney) and last time I visited, it was still there. So I decided it was meant to be.

Contents of the book - there are up to two variations on every main pattern.

Contents of the book – there are up to two variations on every main pattern.

And while there are several very sensible and more practical patterns in this book, the pinstripe jumpsuit captured my interest. So I decided to fly with the idea.

Pinstripe office onesie!

Pinstripe office onesie!

Pattern tracing took me a night, however the alterations and procrastination took me at least another two weeks. Not because they were complicated but I did try to talk myself out of this odd outfit choice and procrastinated over the pattern changes.

Tracing

My favourite thing to trace my patterns with is a product called ‘Trace & Toile’ from Spotlight (Australia). At $20 a 10 metre roll, it is expensive. I wait for a sale and purchase several rolls at $10. I don’t sew as much as I used to, the upside to this is that a roll will see me through many patterns.

Trace & Toile

Trace & Toile

While it has it faults – pen rubs off a little, heavier to see through – I love the fact I can baste my pattern pieces together to get an idea of fit. This product gives me a better idea than I seem to achieve with tissue paper fitting – and saves me the trials and tribulations (and precious time) a fabric toile can take. It doesn’t replace a fabric toile but if you don’t think you need drastic alterations you can quickly see if more length etc is needed. Long basting stitches slide out easily and I can cut the pattern pieces and sew in strips to lengthen a pattern or fold//sew shortening tucks to modify a pattern. These modifications become a permanent sewn-in element of my finished pattern which I then make the garment from.

Minor Modifications

These Japanese patterns are drafted for someone only slightly taller than me. As mentioned on previous posts, I am proportionally long through the torso and jumpsuits make pattern modifications a necessity as no-one wants to wear – or see – a jumpsuit wedgie!

Book size chart

Book size chart

I added 1 1/2 inches to the crotch depth, this was intentionally longer than needed as I wanted a casual, very loose jumpsuit to wear during summer. I added 1 inch to the bodice – however found this made the waist too low and I removed it, I might even shorten the bodice if I was to make it again. I should have added some length to the legs as well – I turned the hems up with bias binding as the unfinished length was close to perfect.

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit – front view. Note to self: stand up straight!

I added belt loops and a self-fabric belt. I prefer to wear this looped through the belt keepers and then tied at the back, rather than wrapping it around the front. It created a bit of shape without being pulled in against my waist. Very loose and easy to wear.

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit. Proof that I happily share my beach photos with everyone! I have no shame. Windy afternoon as well – less an ideal for photos but such is life.

I would probably insert an invisible zip in the side seams if I was to make it again. It’s a little wriggle to pull it up and over my hips (note to self, not too many yummy Christmas indulgences this year) – a zipper would help.

I do need to wear a singlet or tshirt under it – however I like the overall/jumpsuit mix, one of the things that attracted me to it.

This is made from tencel denim from ‘the stash’ purchased from a bargain table for the grand sum of $5 a metre… or maybe it was $4 a metre. I also squeezed another Tessuti Sadie Slip dress out of this, similar to this dress I blogged over a year ago – which I love!

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit

Agreed. This jumpsuit is a slight crazy garment. I wore it all day today – the best way to assess a garment’s suitability to your lifestyle is to put it ‘through its paces’. It passed the lifestyle test with flying colours. I love it. It’s a bit oddball but quite unique – and exceptionally comfortable. I am also confident I will not be bumping into any other denim-clad Gumby wannabes in the downtown Port Macquarie. So it’s a win-win for me.

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit

Japanese Denim Jumpsuit. I don’t wear it with the belt tied at the front. Too wrinkly, too obvious. I prefer the belt to just pull it in a little at the back. Mad crazy hair – completely natural!

See it in action? Visit Instagram!

Photographed terribly in the late afternoon sunset last weekend, too much glare and the tencel looks shiny. The Instagram images (or Boomerangs) are much more true to the actual garment and you can see me wiggling in an action shot… life is too short to be too serious… and let’s be honest, I don’t pretend to be a high fashion model!

This isn’t going to be everyone’s ‘cup of tea’ – however it’s mine. I appreciate some will hate it. If we all sewed, liked and wore the same style… well… that wouldn’t be terribly interesting would it?

The thought of wearing a pinstripe onesie to work is still very appealing…

Pattern: No.5 from untranslated Japanese pattern book which loosely translates as “7 Basic dresses” – this jumpsuit also includes as a jumper dress option. ISBN 978-4-579-11570-9
Fabric: Tencel polka dot denim, Spotlight Australia

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Stylish Remakes – book review & giveaway

or The Long Overdue Book Review Post!

I have a slight addiction to Japanese pattern books. It’s been reasonably well documented here.

My interest in Japanese style, design, arts & crafts spans much further back into my creative life when I made patchwork quilts. My first sampler quilt was inspired by a navy Japanese quilting cotton. Anyway that’s another story!

Stylish Remakes - Violette Room - Tuttle Publishing

Stylish Remakes – Violette Room – Tuttle Publishing

Last year Tuttle Publishing contacted me about one of their upcoming titles, Stylish Remakes by Violette Room.

Violette Room is a fashon company, founded by Bunka Fashion Institute Graduate Mari Hamano.

I was curious about this title, as in addition to my interest in Japanese arts and crafts, I also have a passion for ‘op shopping’ (secondhand/charity/thrift shops) and vintage clothing – well documented on my Instagram feed. My most recent find being a pair of Rock & Republic jeans for $1 – perfect fit!

Stylish Remakes is a soft cover book with a range of projects to “upcycle and reinvent your tired old clothes and thrift store finds into trendy new threads”.

This book isn’t your typical Japanese sewing pattern book. While there are instructions, there are no pattern sheets. It is more of a guide of how to go about the process of upcycling and embellishing your clothes or thrift shop finds.

While I generally sew up something from a book I review, for this particular review I didn’t see the point as every single experience is going to be completely different. Your outcomes are going to be dependent on having or sourcing clothes to upcycle and embellish, so I see this book as an inspirating starting point.

Some of the possibilities…

Embellishing

  • Adding a fancy bow or collar to an old tshirt or sweater.
  • Add ruffles or a peplum to a man’s shirt to create a more feminine silhouette.
Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. T-shirts

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room.
T-shirts

Upcycling

  • Sew a new skirt from a pair of old shirts (My teenage daughter thinks these are awesome – she’s a free spirit who wear the most amazing Doc Marten boots you have ever seen so I think she would rock this look… not to mention the fact she moved my second sewing machine into her bedroom… and whipped herself up a pair of flannel PJ pants this weekend).
  • Pair up a skirt and top, sew them together and create a new ‘dress’.
  • Use an old t-shirt to create a baby’s onesie.
Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Flannel Shirts

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Flannel Shirts


Create

  • Create a dress or a bag from bandanna scarves.
Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Bandannas

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Bandannas

THE CONTENTS

The book has been organised into chapters:-

  • T-shirts
  • Flannel Shirts
  • Borders
  • College Sweats
  • Gabardine Coats
  • Bandannas

All up there are 25 projects, all presented with lovely clear photography.

THE INSTRUCTIONS

If you are at all familar with Japanese sewing books, the layout and presentation of the instructions is standard to these translated sewing books. The instructions are concise but sufficient – and accompanied by a number of clear and well captioned illustrations.

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Instructions

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Instructions

THOUGHTS

While I don’t think this is quite the book for me, as I can’t imagine myself dressed in quite so quirky a fashion, my daughter loves it! So it’s the first book in her personal sewing library. She appears to have inherited my great love of thrifting so I suspect she will be seeking out some clothes to refashion on our next thrift shopping expedition!

If you have never thought of thrifting or upcycling your clothes, perhaps Stylish Remakes might be an interesting place to start.

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Gabardine Coats

Stylish Remakes, Violette Room. Gabardine Coats

GIVEAWAY

Comment below and tell me your best vintage find – clothing, pattern, sewing machine or anything else – I love a good thrift find! Giveaway closes 6pm, 24 April 2016 (Australian EST).

Book: Stylish Remakes by Violette Room, published by Tuttle Publishing

 

FASHION REVOLUTION

Tomorrow sees the commencement of Fashion Revolution week, running from 18-24 April. What’s that? from http://fashionrevolution.org/

We believe that fashion can be made in a safe, clean and beautiful way. Where creativity, quality, environment and people are valued equally.

On 18-24 April, Fashion Revolution Week will bring people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes and accessories.

Fashion Revolution was born when on 24 April 2014, 1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 were injured when the Rana Plaza complex collapsed in Bangladesh – the worst industrial accident in the garment industry. I’m not here to write a blog post about it – however it makes for interesting read and will make you think about a whole range of issues. You can read more here.

 

Note: for this post I received a copy of the book Stylish Remakes from Tuttle Publishing to review. All opinions my own.

This post first appeared on www.sewbusylizzy.com

 

Stylish Party Dressses Giveaway Winner – more to come

I’ve been rather swamped by life so it’s taken me a while to find my blogging feet again. It happens.

I’m back briefly to let you know that the lucky winner of the Stylish Party Dresses giveaway is Amanda Black! Please send me an email at sewbusylizzy (at) gmail (dot) com and I will post it out to you!

Stylish Party Dresses: the English and Japanese editions

Stylish Party Dresses: the English and Japanese editions

Thank you all so much for your lovely comments, there were a few questions amongst them and I will get back and answer those soon! Thank you – every comment makes me smile and after a long, rough work day that’s always much appreciated 🙂

I have another book from Tuttle Publishing to review very soon! This one is Stylish Remakes – and two copies to give away… so watch this space for an upcoming review and another giveaway.

I’ve ALSO got a copy of Boundless Style by Kristiann Boos of Victory Patterns to review, one to giveaway and a project I’ve made from the book!

I’ll be back soon!

Note: winner decided by random.org

Stylish Party Dresses – and my boho Drape Top

… or what to wear when you aren’t wearing a party dress…

I had already purchased the Japanese version of this book Stylish Party Dresses, traced this top & had it on my lengthy list of books in my personal collection to review (which is becoming embarassingly extensive!). When Tuttle Publishing contacted me with an English copy to review and offered to provide a giveaway copy (giveaway now closed), it made sense to accept. I had struggled with the Japanese version of the pattern sheet and I was delighted to get my hands on an English version as I liked many of the patterns.

Drape Top i from Stylish Party Dresses

Hey Lizzy – where’s the party dress? Or even a stylish dress? Slightly windy day on the beach so it’s being blown about a bit.

With this book I was immediately drawn to the tops, jackets and cape-sleeved bolero. I liked a couple of the dresses but it was the possibilities of the other items that drew me in and lead me to compulsively purchase the Japanese version months and months ago.

THE TOP

I was tempted to sew this top in silk… I think it would make a luxe top with skinny jeans or cigarette pants or a pencil skirt… however I opted to stick with the spirit of the book and found a budget-friendly fabric. I purchased this woven rayon, on sale, at Spotlight. It’s a lovely mosiac, stained-glass style print.

It's quite modest and conservative at the front.

It’s quite modest and conservative at the front.

Where I didn’t stick to the spirit of the book is the ‘party dresses’ theme. I thought it would be interesting to look beyond how the designs are presented and find new ways to wear them. In the book this top is paired with a loose mini or maxi skirt.

This top has a front yoke with a couple of sets of gathers above the bust, the sleeves are full and wrist length. from the front, the top is quite conservative and modest.

The body is very flared and the back drapes beautifully – yes ‘drapes’, of course I was going to love this! It’s a ‘business at the front and party at the back’ top. The back opening is wide/low and I had to tug my back bra strap down for the photos. I’d be tempted to raise the back ‘v’ a little next time as I hate fiddling with clothing that I am wearing. The tie across the shoulders does help keep the top in place and is a nice decorative finish.

Construction details: I cut out two yoke pieces and burritoed (self-lined) the front yoke – to increase the neatness of the internal finish. I used French seams on the sleeves, back and side seams – when the fabric is lightweight, I love French seams. The neckline and back opening is finished with self bias-binding. The back tie I made from self fabric – sewing a long thin tube and turning it right-side out with a bobby pin. I knotted the ends of the ties.

top - flat

The pattern matching isn’t so great at the back… however the draping of the back conceals this centre back seam when I’m wearing it

Let me gloat for a moment about that pattern matching at the centre front yoke....

Let me gloat for a moment about that pattern matching at the centre front yoke….

Sizing: I fell into the 6 size range but chose to make up size 4 – and as you can see, there is plenty of ease!

THE BOOK

It’s no secret I love Japanese pattern books. I have a considerable collection! Last year I fell in love with the unique designs of Drape Drape (I have a genuine urge to make some more at the moment)… and now I have come to love some of their ‘everyday’ clothing books as the minimalist designs, loose fit and sizing suit my build and lifestyle. I know this isn’t the experience for everyone… however it works for me.

Stylish Party Dresses: the English and Japanese editions

Stylish Party Dresses: the English and Japanese editions

As I mentioned, I own the untranslated version of this book – in fact I purchased it because I fell in love with the top I’ve made for this post. The Japanese book version is just beautiful, it’s a larger format and has a different cover and is called ‘Formal and Little Black Dress‘. Even my non-sewing friends comment about the beauty of Japanese sewing books, they are often beautifully shot and have an eye-catching serene aesthetic.

This book offers 26 dresses and separates which seems to represent excellent value for the cost of the book.

THE DESIGNS

Some of the design details are obscured by the printed fabrics and photography. However if you flick to the instructions section of this book, every set of design instructions provides a line drawing which is excellent way to determine the design features.

I’m drawn to the jacket, cape and tops in this book. I wear a lot of dresses, mainly to work, however I do love to create tops & jackets to wear with jeans as that’s my out-of-work uniform. It’s quite easy to look beyond the styling of Stylish Party Dresses and see that many of these items can be worn casually or paired with pencil skirts, jeans and the like.

I haven’t photographed every design – please see English Girl at Home for additional design images and Top Notch who has also reviewed this book.

Designs a and b from Stylish Party Dresses, published by Tuttle Publishing.

A tulle skirted and a lace overlay dress… now THAT’S a party dress!

This bolero has cape-sleeves. Gorgeous.

This bolero has cape-sleeves. Gorgeous.

I love this little lace jacket.

I love this little lace jacket.

This is a mock-wrap dress. if you prefer a looser fit to a traditional wrap dress and an elastic waist - this could be for you.

This is a mock-wrap dress. if you prefer a looser fit to a traditional wrap dress and an elastic waist – this could be for you.

The top I fell in love with - in the book it is paired with a loose mini skirt. I prefer the fullness of the top paired with a slimmer skirt or pant.

The top I fell in love with – in the book it is paired with a loose mini skirt. I prefer the fullness of the top paired with a slimmer skirt or pant.

I think I just like that lace fabric... but as for the red... I struggle with frills and ruffles of any kind...

I think I just like that lace fabric… but as for the red… I struggle with frills and ruffles of any kind…

I love the little blouse 'design n'. A simple wearable everyday design

I love the little blouse ‘design n’, I’ve already traced it and have some flamingo rayon waiting for it. A simple wearable everyday design

Jumpsuit for the brave!

Jumpsuit for the brave!

I like this chiffon mini dress - but imagine it on me in a burnt-out cotton voile as a summer beach dress/throwover

I like this chiffon mini dress – but imagine it on me in a burnt-out cotton voile as a summer beach dress/throwover

I do love this raglan sleeve mini dress and would love to try this as a t-shirt dress in a rayon knit.

I love this raglan sleeve mini dress and would love to try this as a t-shirt dress in a rayon knit.

Sorry bad shot - this jacket as a frotn frill - impossible to photograph the details as it is black. It's simple, sweet and it made in poly georgette for this book.

Sorry bad shot – this jacket as a front frill – impossible to photograph the details as it is black. It’s simple, sweet and it made in poly georgette for this book.

SIZING

Yes. Japanese sizing range is smaller than our traditional ‘Western’ sizing. That said I’ve got a few Japanese books (I Am Cute Dresses as an example) that don’t cater for my measurements, they are too large for me, so don’t dismiss Japanese books without some investigation. I’m not saying these books will suit everyone however if you are falling just outside the size range – you might be surprised.

Catering from busts from 30 3/4 inches to 40 1/2 inches.

Catering from busts from 30 3/4 inches to 40 1/2 inches.

THE PATTERN SHEET

You will need to trace. The patterns are overlapped and printed in a single colour but not a mess of lines so it’s not too tedious.

the pattern sheet

the pattern sheet

Tracing the pattern was more challenging as the pieces were located across two sheets, the markings are slightly different to western pattern markings and these patterns share many pattern pieces – with different lines for armholes, lengths and necklines. I re-traced it in the English version – and while it is MUCH easier, it does require concentration to ensure you have chosen the right line. I traced the back and front piece twice… I was tired and rushing the first time and didn’t trace the pieces at the more flared line.

There are two pattern sheets (double sided) and these are contained in an envelope in the back of the book.

THE INSTRUCTIONS

The instructions are brief but clear and accompanied bynumbering, garment line drawings and illustrations. People with sewing experience will find these instructions brief but adequate. It might be challenging for a beginner – but you don’t know what you don’t know at that stage – Google is always most helpful in this regard!

Stylish Party Dresses - typical instructions.

Stylish Party Dresses – typical instructions.

FINAL THOUGHTS

I like it. Clearly. I liked it enough to purchase an untranslated version, I excitedly spammed -instagrammed many of the images when I purchased the Japanese book. I’m delighted to have the English version as I’m going to make up some more of these patterns as I do love the simplicity for everyday wear.

I haven’t tested every pattern or proof read every line of the instructions – the book would be out-of-print before I finished! However overall the quality appears to be the standard I’ve come to expect from a Tuttle Publishing book.

The patterns in this book are very simple – and it sells itself as that ‘easy and inexpensive sew-it-yourself dresses for that special occasion’. You could use cheaper fabrics… you could use silks, linens and fancy fabrics – and many of these minimalist designs would shine in luxe fabrics. Either way, you can interpret these patterns to suit your own style and life – or party for that matter.

Some of the language and symbols are slightly different to some of the other Big 4 or indie patterns on the market – however it just takes a little time to adjust to a slightly different approach. I would expect this from any new/different pattern company.

With 26 dresses, tops, jackets and skirts provided in Stylish Party Dresses, I think this book does represent good value for your spend if the designs appeal and suit you.

GIVEAWAY

Let me know if you would like to be included in the giveaway draw in the comments below. Note this is open to anyone in the world and will be chosen via http://www.random.org. Giveaway closes Tuesday 3 November at 5pm (Australian Eastern Standard Time). GIVEAWAY NOW CLOSED.

I received two copies and provided one of these copies to the Brisbane Frocktails event (on 31 October 2015) as a lucky door prize.

Pattern: Drape Top (i) from Stylish Party Dresses, published by Tuttle Publishing
Fabric: Rayon, from Spotlight, $9 a metre, used approximately 1.8m (135cm wide)

top - side

I’ve worn this all day – I feel very ‘boho beach chic’ in it and it’s perfect on a warm sunny day. #winner

I’m running well behind schedule on everything at the moment, it’s the story of 2015, such is life. Right now, my back is being a drama queen. I’m limited to sewing simple makes which don’t require hours of cutting or sitting at the machine as my back locks up. I’ve put back my Mood Fabrics Network make as I need to rest my back a little more. I should be good within a week and after perhaps one more torturous but necessary physiotherapist visit.

Note: Tuttle Publishing provided this pattern for review purposes.
All opinions my own. No affiliate links in this post.

This post first appeared on http://www.sewbusylizzy.com

Book Review: Sewing For Your Girls

When Tuttle Publishing sent me the much-anticipated She Wears The Pants to review, they also sent a copy of Sewing For Your Girls. Talk about different ends of the spectrum! Today I’m blogging about the Girls book a the little blouse I made from the book.

Giselle blouse 3

THE BOOK

I must say this book surprised me. Japanese pattern books are famed for their scanty sewing instructions and daunting pattern sheets! Sewing for your girls is not one of ‘those’ books.

Sewing For Your Girls published by Tuttle Publishing

There are seven relatively simple patterns – along with a variation on each basic pattern (oops sorry – forgot to take a photo of one, it’s No.1 an A-line smock… and it’s nearly 10pm now). You can click on the images below to enlarge them.

It has by far the most comprehensive sewing instructions I’ve seen in a Japanese sewing book in a long time. I learnt a few new tricks – I love that! Nothing of rocket science proportions but little clever things that just make life easier.

A typical pattern instruction page... the instructions are brief but point to the more detailed techniques section of the book which contain LOTS of photos!

A typical pattern instruction page… the instructions are brief but point to the more detailed techniques section of the book which contain LOTS of photos!

The book includes a guide for no less than 70 dressmaking and basic sewing techniques. Each of theses are accompanied by step-by-step photos. In fact some techniques are extensively demonstrated…. for example when I attached the collar to this shirt, the book provided a 20-step guide, each step was paired with a photograph.

This is the 'how to attach a collar' technique section of the book - it's very detailed!

This is the ‘how to attach a collar’ technique section of the book – it’s very detailed!

The pattern sheet has some over-lapping and it’s printed in one colour. However, it is not overcrowded and tracing is quite straightforward. You just need to remember to add seam allowances!

The pattern sheet is not as crowded as other Japanese books I have used - and much, much easier than a Burda sheet!

The pattern sheet is not as crowded as other Japanese books I have used – and much, much easier than a Burda sheet!

I prefer to sewing something from a book when I’m talking to you about it. I think it’s integral to the experience of a sewing book when the book is primarily about patterns. That said, I don’t claim to have sewn every pattern or read the book or pattern in ‘editing’ terms. With translated books or measurements converted between metric & imperial there are often slip-ups just be conscious you need to exert a level of awareness – I often double check everything. Just.in.case.

Everyone asks about Japanese sizing, so here is the chart for your reference.

Sewing For Your Girls published by Tuttle Publishing

Sizing chart: Sewing For Your Girls

THE BLOUSE

Cute. I love this little blouse. It was utterly delightful to sew. Giselle wasn’t keen for photos – fair enough, she had surfing to do. So today’s post has a blouse minus the body.

I absolutely loved making this blouse, a real joy. Better still, she loves it.

I absolutely loved making this blouse, a real joy. Better still, she loves it.

NEW TRICKS

What did I learn? Frills have been few & far between on my blog… so these little bias cut frills were new to me. Rather than running a gathering stitch up the centre of the frill, I ran a gathering stitch up either side of the centre.

A simple and neat way to create perfect little frills.

A simple and neat way to create perfect little frills.

I also learnt to run a line of gathering stitches around the seam allowance of a Peter Pan collar curve, gently gather the seam allowance up so the allowance curves over into the collar itself, a light press, trim off the excess seam allowance (and gathering stitches) and then turn the collar right side out… perfect collar curves!

THOUGHTS

This book was quite different to what I expected – far more detailed instructions and construction photographs than I have found in other Japanese sewing books.

The clothes are simple but I often preferred to dress my girls in simple, play-friendly clothes when they were little. Many of these patterns would be perfect for sweet floral and kooky lawns, voiles, linens and poplins. Let the fabric sing and the child play unfettered by fussy clothes I say!

THANK YOU
A big thank you to Colette of Colette’s Sewing Stuff for bringing this sweet fabric to the March Brisbane meet-up. And a thank you to the ever-lovely Vicki-Kate of Vicki-Kate Makes for sending me a sweet little gift package a few months ago which included these perfect little buttons!

THE DETAILS
Pattern: Basic Pattern #7 from Sewing For Your Girls, published by Tuttle Publishing
Note: Tuttle Publishing provided this book for preview purposes. All opinions my own. No affiliate links in this post.
Fabric: from the march Brisbane High Tea, donated by Colette
Buttons: from Vicki Kate Makes

THE WEARER
This is the blouse recipient, my dear little crazy poppet Giselle Violet. A fuzzy iPhone snap taken one night… one of those sweet little moments in life. She’s in her school uniform and wearing a much-loved beanie crocheted by the boss at work!

Giselle Violet

Giselle Violet

This post first appeared on http://www.sewbusylizzy.com

 

Ahoy! She Wears The Pants (again)… No 4 Top with Epaulettes

I’ve been wondering… how many t-shirts patterns does one need to own? For me it was at least one more when I spotted this one in She Wears The Pants

Just a quick post today. I’ve got four posts in the wings… some posts take longer to write than others – however a simple jersey top doesn’t require much chatter or links. It was a very bright winter day – so forgive the harsh shadows and enjoy my winter’s day!

She wears the pants - jersey top 1

Yes, another make from She Wears The Pants (book review here – giveaway closed).

This is my third make from this book, so far I’ve made the Gathered Blouse and the Square Top. I really like this book, it’s very much my style… although apparently I can be somewhat bossy (I like to think of it as assertive) so maybe the title appeals to me as well LOL. It’s been a welcome addition to my sewing library – thank you Tuttle Publishing!

I scooped up a remanent of striped cotton jersey at Spotlight recently and immediately thought of this top. I had loved the softer blue stripe in this fabric for some time… however had not purchased it as it has little stretch and drape. When I picked it up again, I thought of this pattern and thought that the fabric having less drape/stretch would make it perfect for accentuating the slight bell shape of the sleeves and body of this top.

Back view: She Wears the Pants - No 4 Top with Epaulettes.

Back view: She Wears the Pants – No 4 Top with Epaulettes.

I stripe matched as best as I could, the side seams and shoulders (covered by epaulettes LOL so no point but I did it anyway) are great – the sleeves into the body not so much. The stripes are printed, not woven into the knit.

She Wears the Pants - No 4 Top with Epaulettes

No 4 Top with Epaulettes. Neckline facing, button and epaulettes

The epaulets are simple to make and you just baste them onto the shoulders before you set the sleeves in. I thought about omitting the epaulettes then decided they would tie in well with the nautical, quirky shape of the top. I like them.

I love the neckline finish. It has a facing instead of a binding. I know some people loathe facings but I really like the finish on this top. The neckline sits beautifully (it is understitched as well). I like how the facing is stitched down around the outer edge, it is a nice finishing touch.

Thoughts…

Yes, it’s another t-shirt pattern and there are a lot out there. I do like the shape of this one. I think the boat neckline and the slight flare in the sleeves/body are really sweet.

I like the sleeve length, I tend to shove or roll up longer sleeves – this length is perfect for me.

I think I love the fit of some Japanese patterns across my shoulders and upper bust – and the easy fit through the body.

I cut the body at the longest length as I tend to wear low-waisted garments but hate belly flashing. The ancient 3/4 jeans in these pictures are particularly low cut – and I should toss them… but I love the leg length for a beach walk so I keep them.

Other than the hems & epaulettes, I constructed this top using my overlocker. I serged lightweight hem fusing onto the hem edges, turned the hem allowamces to the inside, pressed and finished with two rows of stitching on my machine.

Please note the sizing of this book definitely is on the smaller scale. Japanese patterns often have a lot of ease but you need to take this into account when considering purchasing this book. I cut a size XS and a body length of Large (my sizing hovers between XS & S and my height makes me a slightly taller than a Medium in this book’s sizing chart – which you can find in this post.).

Pattern: She Wears The Pants, No 4 Top with Epaulettes.
Fabric: Combed Cotton Jersey, Spotlight Australia (about $9 for the piece)

Also see: CSews, Very Kerry Berry

It’s winter here – but you would not have guessed it today. The weather was magic.

Bonus Banjo Photo Bomb

because no beach photo is complete without my dear old hound.

… because no beach photo is complete without my dear old hound.

Note: Tuttle Publishing provided this book for preview purposes. All opinions my own – I just keep sewing garments from the book because I like it so much!
No affiliate links in this post.

She Wears The Pants - published by Tuttle Publishing

My top is the make on the cover – note the pants are not included in the book’s patterns.

This post first appeared on http://www.sewbusylizzy.com