Vintage McCalls 6587, the reversible wrap dress


With the crossover at the front. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

With the crossover at the front. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979. I vintaged my photos a little to match an old pattern envelope. Just for fun.

I’ve gotten myself back into a work-work-work rut. So in an effort to drag myself back to ‘me’, I’ve committed to sewing – or doing something sewing related – for at least 10 minutes a day. This is the first outcome of that little promise to myself.

It’s strange how some patterns seem to fall out of the sky and I think this one is ‘meant to be’. With a huge thank you to Kat of Seamstress Fabrics whose internet sleuthing uncovered some copies of this rare pattern creature. The pattern back describes it as a “turn-about wrap-sundress”.

McCalls 6587, printed in 1979

McCalls 6587, printed in 1979. Size: small

I sewed this up quickly with a fine stripe cotton I’ve had maturing in the fabric stash for years. I wasn’t sure it would work or fit… turns out that I think I’ve met a new best friend in this pattern.

With the crossover at the front, square back neckline. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

With the crossover at the front, square back neckline. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

I’ve sewn this in a woven – and I think you need to be careful not to choose a fabric with too much body as it does need a little bit of softness or drape as the lower bodice and skirt are gathered and then sewn together. The bodice has a soft blousing effect at the waistline.

With the crossover at the back. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

With the crossover at the back. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979. Hair everywhere – thank you sea breeze!

The skirt pattern pieces had been shortened by two inches – and I sewed it up with this alteration as I’m 5 foot 4 and I decided it was probably going to work.

I took up the straps 2 inches(!) to fix the very low armholes and bodice gaping.

I suspect the skirt has pocket extensions (based on the instructions) and these have been trimmed off the original pattern. I just inserted side pockets in the usual way. Seems to have worked.

Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

You can see how the underarm and back gapes a little. I think you need to accept to achieve a reversible dress that unless it is in stretch, it’s going to be a roomier fit. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

There isn’t much to say about this except it’s really sweet and I love wearing it.

Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979. Square neck.

And I think I need more…

That, my friends, is all.

With the crossover at the front. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

With the crossover at the front. Vintage McCalls 6587, printed in 1979.

Pattern: McCalls 6587, printed 1979
Fabric: Fine blue/white striped cotton, with a slight crinkle. I think I paid $3 a metre several years ago at Spotlight. It was an unlabelled fabric on a bargain table!

Also see: Tessuti blog

 

26 thoughts on “Vintage McCalls 6587, the reversible wrap dress

  1. Very cute and versatile. Yes, you probably need another one! I am so glad to see you back, and do keep your promises to yourself, Lizzy. They are so important!

  2. How blooming clever that a dress can be worn back to front and look gorgeous both ways! Cleverer still that you are fitting sewing into a work-work-work regime. I’m a gonna take leaves out of your book! x

  3. Wow this is so much like the Vogue 7334 (probably from the same year!) I’ve been smashing out multiples of this summer too! Its SUPER similar except its not a back/front pattern and the back is quite a bit lower. I modified the waist away from gathered elastic to only have ties which I adjust as needed. Its so breezy and easy to wear and goes well with all the bralettes I’ve been buying up like a fiend lately.

    • I’m working on the workload issue. I generally just work like a crazy person so I can get clear to have a day off. Then I’m too tired to enjoy it – but hopefully life will improve soon!

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